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Nathan of Brainfertilizer Fame

Centaura questions

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How rare are maple fretboards on the early Centauras?

Is Pau Ferro basically just a slightly lighter-colored rosewood? Or is it less porous, too?

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How rare are maple fretboards on the early Centauras?

Is Pau Ferro basically just a slightly lighter-colored rosewood? Or is it less porous, too?

1) Can't say

2) The 2nd one. Feels much closer to ebony to me than the typical indian rosewood freboard (which I tend to not like the feel of due to the porousity).

-Austin

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I don't think maple boarded centauras are extremly rare. Less made than rosewood for sure, but not virtuoso rare by any means.

Pau Ferro to me is just a more colorful rosewood.

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I love Pau Ferro boards. They feel great for playing.

My Centaura, T-62 and Vintage S all have them.

I do see maple boards on Centuara's pop up on Ebay

every now and then. Pau Ferro feels different to me

than rosewood. Non maple board Centauras seem to

come up for sale more often that the maple ones do.

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I had an all maple Centaura w/ a Tobacco burst finish (I think the body was ash) - that was a really good guitar. I just acquired a Daytona with an all maple neck (to accompany a Daytona with a rosewood neck), I can't wait to A - B them.

Here's a quick blurb I saw that describes P-F:

Pau Ferro/Morado Fingerboard

In the last few years this has become quite a popular fingerboard wood, mostly among electric guitar manufacturers. The devotees include Fender™, Music Man™, Peavey™, Sadowsky™, and several more. It’s likely to become even more popular in the next few years as it will probably be less expensive than Indian Rosewood, the current wood of choice for fingerboards among large manufacturers. Pau Ferro (Machaerium villosum or schleroxylon), also known as Morado, Santos Rosewood, or Bolivian Rosewood is not a true Rosewood, but it boasts many of the qualities that are highly regarded in a fingerboard wood. It’s stable, abrasion resistant, hard, attractive, exotic and has good compression strength parallel to the grain. It’s not so resinous that it can be difficult to glue like a few of the Rosewoods. From Brazil and Bolivia, supplies are adequate and no shortages are anticipated.

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Hmmm.. What is less common? A mpale board Centaura or one with an ebony board?

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