Jump to content
Hamer Fan Club Message Center
  • 0
Sign in to follow this  
triodecr

Poll: Most effective mods to improve Bigsby return-to-pitch accuracy?

Most effective mods to improve Bigsby return-to-pitch accuracy  

10 members have voted

You do not have permission to vote in this poll, or see the poll results. Please sign in or register to vote in this poll.

Question

What are the most effective mods you have done to improve Bigsby return-to-pitch accuracy?  The guitar in question is a PRS Starla (core) with stock vintage style Kluson tuners. Thanks for your input.

Edited by triodecr

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

14 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

Oooooh, we don’t do polls often. I put other cause the Bigsby on my Newport (first Bigsby) stayed in tune pretty good when I got it, but when I added a Reverend Soft Spring it took it to the next leve both tuning-wise and playing-wise.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Other for me. 

I have minimal issues with the B3 on my SG Classic and the B5 on my Newport with just with a well-cut nut, smooth bridge saddles, and a little 3-in-1 oil on all string contact points. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

+1 on the 3-in-1 on the contact points....especially the bridge cause it prevents corrosion on the string where it crosses the saddle as well as lubricating it.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Two Hamer's with Bigsbys. No tuning problems unless i molest that sucker pretty badly. Stays in tune better than a Fender trem.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

All of the above.  Locking tuners help, but I daresay that having a nut cut for tremolo use and with extra lubrication is better. Also, make sure the bigby itself is properly lubricated. It seems like the tension bar is the cause of a lot of issues if it does not rotate smoothly. Another issue is the if you bend one string, the tension bar doesn't roll, so sometimes that string can go out of tune.

I mean, I have a bigsby, I like something about it, but I would not get one again.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Bigsby Heavy spring and a 6/6 nylon nut properly cut. The 6/6 nylon nut works way too good.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Thanks for the replies. It's staying in tune better today so maybe I just needed to let the strings settle in more.  The nut was cut for 10s and use 9s so I was hoping it wouldn't have any binding issues.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
2 hours ago, tbonesullivan said:

All of the above.  Locking tuners help, but I daresay that having a nut cut for tremolo use and with extra lubrication is better. Also, make sure the bigby itself is properly lubricated. It seems like the tension bar is the cause of a lot of issues if it does not rotate smoothly. Another issue is the if you bend one string, the tension bar doesn't roll, so sometimes that string can go out of tune.

I mean, I have a bigsby, I like something about it, but I would not get one again.

I'll probably add locking tuners at some point because it's my M.O.

I don't know the history of the guitar as I got it a few days ago so it'll be worth my time to oil the bearings well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
1 hour ago, murkat said:

Bigsby Heavy spring and a 6/6 nylon nut properly cut. The 6/6 nylon nut works way too good.

I see 6/6 is the type of nylon.  More than I ever care to know about nylon:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nylon_66

I'll have to source some and give it a try.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

I’m happy with a roller bridge. A nylon nut makes it itchy glitchy at the top end too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

I didn't vote, but cheated so I could see the results.  I own a Monaco and a MIII which don't get played much but they both have Bigsby's.  I don't use the Bigsby and I don't have tuning issues.  However I've been tempted in the past to try a Compton Bridge.  Does anyone have experience with a Compton Bridge?  http://www.comptonbridges.com/home  It makes logical sense as there would be less binding on the T.O.M. bridge piece.

Edited by dhuber

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Roller bridge,  lubricate the Bigsby front roller, and the nut, and I have no tuning problems; upgrading the roller makes a substantial improvement to the the tone of the guitar.

   Jaberwock

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

So I ordered a Callaham front roller and it doesn't fit.  Yep, I have a US made B5. The Callaham shaft is larger than the stock shaft by a small amount but enough that it won't fit without drilling the B5 frame.  The roller is larger in diameter than the stock roller and it hits on the frame when I try to insert it in place. It's close enough that I can probably force it in but then the roller won't roll.  The B5's casting and machining isn't impressive so I'm guessing their machining tolerances are causing my issues.  I emailed Callaham so we'll see if they confirm my suspicions.  Sigh... I was looking forward to playing this guit tonight....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

I happened to find my needle file set and fine flat file last night (we moved and haven't fully unpacked) so I set to work.

This afternoon I received Callaham's reply and I'm impressed.  A good company for sure.

"You can run a 3/16 drill thru the hole for the axel to clean out the burr left by the Bigsby axel.  If the horseshoe is twisted or warped that can cause a problem.  We can shorten the front roller if needed.  You can even send the Bigsby to us and we will custom fit it.  You just pay return shipping.  But warped or twisted horseshoes is a common problem."

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×