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Getting old!!


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What age did you guys find yourself stopping listening to new stuff? Or if you seek out new artists, do you look for stuff that sounds like older artists you’re into , or is it truly new?

I still hear new bands I like here and there….but for the last 5 years or so I pretty much only buy albums from bands that I’ve already listened to for a long time.

Then there’s music genres…for me the line was EDM. I think that was the first time I really was thinking, ok, I hate this and I don’t even want to give it a chance. Like my parents’ reaction to hip-hop! Ha ha. I must be getting old. J

ps, I know there is still a lot of good stuff coming out...but I'm kind of in one those ruts where my interests has waned. I know it'll come back eventually.

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Newest stuff is somewhat mid 90ties... Shame on me. SHAME! :wacko:

But that's the way it is. And a friend of mine, he is in the mid 50ties, stopped in the late seventies (except for Neil Young, but he's old too, then...)

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I didn't like the 90s.
I can listening to some new music if it is recommended

Listening to Jason Mraz right now...

and we tend to stay young by listening to old stuff

when it comes to music i'll always be 17...open to everything, curious and all embracing :D

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I stopped listening when Blue Oyster Cult broke up. What was left to listen to? What's wrong?, What's right? It was as if gravity was turned off.

No more cowbell solos?

Oh the horror, the horror.

Cheers

caddie

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I used to listen to Pandora, I found that a great way to hear new (to me, anyway) bands that were along the same lines of bands I knew I already liked. I found 'Shonen Knife' that way, 'Symphony X', and even 'The Rashid Ali Quintet'. I don't remember if I found Jimmy Bruno that way, but maybe....Definitely worth a check if you have a hankering for some stuff you don't know already by heart :)

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And a friend of mine, he is in the mid 50ties, stopped in the late seventies (except for Neil Young, but he's old too, then...)

This is waaaaaaaaay close to me!

At 25 in the late summer of 1983 I gave up radio stations that didn't play a lot of "classic rock". Naked Eyes version of "Always Something There To Remind Me" was one thing, but I couldn't endure the endless barrage of Michael Jackson, Duran Duran, Prince (yeah, I know that one goes down hard around here, but when you grow up listening to the Yardbirds, the Who, the Young Rascals and others from the age of 8, Prince just blows!).

Listening to the "One Of These Nights" album by the Eagles right now, but then, IT IS Don Henleys birthday today.

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Of my friends, I am the only one listening to Coheed & Cambria.

After hating Cookie Monster vocals for so long, Amon Amarth has been surprisingly good.

There is a point where new bands go in a different direction than what has come before them. If they are good, they are good.

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After hating Cookie Monster vocals for so long,....

This analogy just never gets old....love it.

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Probably mid-1990s. I don't care for the Cookie Monster stuff, I don't care for the whiny hipster stuff, I don't listen to any music where the first word out is 'yo', and offhand I can't think of even ONE stick-in-my-brain pop song that's been out this summer. My doses of recent music have been limited to TV late-night talk shows and PBS. I very rarely even listen to music on the radio anymore, which is just as well as country gets most of the airplay in my neck of the woods anyway. :(

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For the most part, it was probably when I was 25, give or take a year.

By the time I was 30, browsing music stores wasn't possible anymore. As a teen and early twenty-something, I'd spend hours slowly creeping my way up and down the aisles, flipping through every record looking for something interesting.

There are a smattering of post-80s bands I listen to, but it's a small percentage of what I own.

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I stopped listening to music on the radio long ago. If I didn't have children (daughter 23 and son 18), I'd never hear anything new. Being 52, I mostly just buy new stuff from bands and guitar players I've been listening to since the early nineties. Anything new I can steal from the kids!

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I posted this on the Tesla Simplicity thread. My thoughts on it. I have been pondering recently on the part about understanding how a genre evolved leads to better appreciation. If you have no idea how some music evolved, then it will sound foreign to you off the bat. So if you totally stop listening to the radio for 10 years, you may have a hard time adjusting. Remember the scene from Back to Future where Michael J. has them rocking until he starts tearing into EVH, Hendrix stuff and the room is dumbfounded? He says something like "Oh, you guys aren't there yet". That says a lot about a 70 year old not liking 20 something music in general, standards aside.

It's hard for me to judge a new album vs one from the 80's due to the association factor. You associate music with life experience and youth, and that dwindles over time. And is the reason people always say that my music was better than yours, which is always what was produced up until that person hits about age 34. I think as you age, it's harder to see the depths of newer stuff too. No way I could learn nearly every drum lick to a band like Rush today. I would see it as too much too late and not even attempt it. The most spongy parts of the brain fill first. Also discovered some people immediately dislike something if they are not familiar with how it evolved to get to that point.

0-24 - constantly listening to new stuff

24-34 - The balance of listening to new vs back catalog tips to the later each year.

34 and on - The slide towards back catalog continues, many stop listening to new stuff, others continue with certain genre's, very few with new genre's.

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I am all over the map. I dig Cage The Elephant, Jack White, Chevelle, Hollywood Undead, Rob Zombie, Franz Ferdnand, Foo Fighters....... on and on. I listen to a station called 97X that was very new band oriented but I still dig on all the good classics. They play them on 98 Rock. Lot of bands have a catchy tune few have three cd staying power.

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I used to listen to Pandora, I found that a great way to hear new (to me, anyway) bands that were along the same lines of bands I knew I already liked. I found 'Shonen Knife' that way, 'Symphony X', and even 'The Rashid Ali Quintet'. I don't remember if I found Jimmy Bruno that way, but maybe....Definitely worth a check if you have a hankering for some stuff you don't know already by heart :)

+1

Pandora mixes in some more recent bands with my old stuff, but what I really enjoy hearing is "new" old stuff that I didn't catch the first time around....

To answer the OP's question, I quit actively listening to new bands in the 90s when Alice in Chains and Stone Temple Pilots faded and the pop shyte took over America,,, it had nothing to do with me getting older B)

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To answer the OP's question, I quit actively listening to new bands in the 90s when Alice in Chains and Stone Temple Pilots faded and the pop shyte took over America,,, it had nothing to do with me getting older B)

+1! I don't know if you blame everybody else for changing everything around over the years and turning music into crap, but I sure do. :rolleyes::P:lol:

Edited to add: My message to youth: Get off my lawn! :lol:

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I stayed current until around 2000 when the excellence of the 90's was clearly dead and buried, that was age 27 for me.

For me, and through research many other people was 34. I can look at the pop charts from 2000 back to 1963 (not born yet) and recognize the artists, cannot do that now unless it's tabloid personalities. The last album's that I purchased in the same manner as when I was 16 was Garbage 2.0, Filter and Type O Negatives World Coming Down and Rush Vapor trails, then I started downloading stuff occasionally and finally was purged out of the pop scene via age and music becoming unfamiliar.

Music always evolved and I kept up, but at some point I just jumped off the train. One thing of note, I turned on a nu metal station the other day and it still sounds like it did 8 years ago. It must have hit a brick wall.

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Isn't it weird most of us got out around the same time?

Yeah, there's a trend for sure!

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Isn't it weird most of us got out around the same time?

One important moment was when I turned on MTV-X for some metal in 2001 and it was now MTV Jams. That seems to be my breaking point and maybe others too.

It seems like that around 2000 that everything was rap and/or R&B influenced. Even the television commercials had rap beats in the background. Pop metal bands were rapping. So maybe some of us would have stayed in the game a few more years if not for this over representation of urban R&B and Rap in the early 2000's, which imo was one of the low points in music history. I actually liked gangster rap in small doses in the mid 90's, but the entire music scene was turned urban and forced into everything in a short time span from 1995 to 2000. It was overkill of P Diddy and sir mix a lot.

Limp Biscuit, which now I actually like was the first heavy popular band that I just felt too old to be a part of in my early 30's. This also coincided with the appearance of the term Hair Band. So not only was everything changing but earlier stuff was mocked and avoided (see Some Kind of Monster). Then these Blink 82 type punk bands start showing up and the cycle was complete, and I was purged.

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Isn't it weird most of us got out around the same time?

Not me! Pretty much new stuff lately and for years. The other year I had cleaned up my pile of CDs by 50%. Decided on what I did not listen to for years and, therefore, would not likely listen to in the future. Pretty much premium stars went off the shelf. I wanted to burry it somewhere since it won't give any money for CDs anymore either. Finally, it moved to a drawer below the telly. Sometimes my wife pics one out.

The shelf filled up since then with quite some new stuff and some old farts I still love publishing. Since being hooked up to Amazon Music I tend to try out some stuff online. Although, I'm missing the booklets with online buys. I like to read up who's joining in on a CD or specific title.

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For me, "new" meant "new to me", so I found myself going backwards in time and discovering stuff from the 1920s-early 50s blues, country/western, jazz, big band, etc.

So while I'm open to new things which I was never into previously, it turns out I prefer to discover the roots of modern music rather than modern music itself.

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When I discovered the most bands I like I was 11 to 17. That was late-70's to mid-80's. I discoverd interesting stuff till mid-90's, the grunge scene wasn't my thing. I went from hard rock/metal to jazzier stuff. Nowadays, there are few bands I discover, sometimes old stuff like John Coltrane, to new stuff by older guys, like Black Country Communion, Flying Colors to newer stuff sounding like older bands, like Vintage Trouble, Into the Presence. I like classical music and film scores too. There is no new music anyway, I don't need it. I am living in the past, mostly 60's to 70's music. Many 80's-90's stuff I don't listen to that often.

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When CD's appeared is pretty much when I stopped looking for or buying new guitar based music.

Before that there was a lot of new wave/punk stuff floating around that I enjoyed and was buying on vinyl and a lot of the attraction was it was simple to learn and we thought that we were helping to overthrow the BOF's that we've all now become.

I didn't have the dough (they weren't exactly cheap back then) for a new fangled gizmo and didn't want to replace my 12" collection with CD's which weren't cheap either and no one knew if it was going to be a long term replacement for the L.P. or if it would become the Betamax of music.

The 80's hair metal thing never really did much for me even though I was playing in a NWOBHM type band, some great music and playing for sure but too much importance on the scene and the look which really had little relevance to a 20 year old living in Yorkshire.

Not long after this I had a flirtation with the electronic music scene as I had cobbled together a small studio to record my stuff on which used the new 4 track/synth/sampling/midi technology which kind of led me in that direction and a lot of that was circulated on cassette tape or I taped from radio sessions as it wasn't available from any local record shops anyway.

Now even though I have spending money I won't buy stuff unless I know theres more than 1 good song on it (lots of greatest hits) and a lot of the new guitar Metal stuff takes itself far too seriously for me now to want to explore it.

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