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Hamer Guitars USA might be coming back soon.


BCR Greg

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22 hours ago, Gino said:

I thought Kaman was bought by FMIC - so FMIC is selling Hamer guitars ? If so, they should've done better - a lot better!

FMIC sold Kaman to JAM Industries. JAM also recently bought U.S. Music, the parent company of Washburn. That would explain why the Hamer display was in the Washburn booth. FMIC has nothing to do with Hamer anymore.

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57 minutes ago, JohnnyB said:

FMIC sold Kaman to JAM Industries. JAM also recently bought U.S. Music, the parent company of Washburn. That would explain why the Hamer display was in the Washburn booth. FMIC has nothing to do with Hamer anymore.

Well, FMIC sold KMC to JAM Industries - Kaman is still thriving in the Defense/Aerospace sector! ;)

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9 hours ago, tbonesullivan said:

....no freakin idea why FMIC ever bought Kaman music....

FMIC knew waaaaay before they bought it they could part it out and cash in. It's always about the money.

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So after reviewing most of this latest attempt of a new iteration of the "thread from hell" I still haven't been able to cut through the bs, hyperbole, and stone cold vindictiveness to determine if Made in the USA Hamers are going to be made again or not. A simple yes or no would suffice. 

I know, I know, I  rear my ugly old head only once in a blue moon only to stir up shit by asking for a simple response to a simple request. 

 

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@Devrock Yes, but imports. 

I have nothing against well made imports, the ones coming out of the World Musical Instruments company in South Korea are a great value. I have a Zach Meyers PRS SE from there that is a great guitar and a Chinese Ibanez AS 153 that is also well made. They aren't USA models and therein lies the rub.

I want to see who would make them here and the price point. I don't care if any old Hamer guys are involved or not. There are many skilled people available who can make them just as well as the old crew. Then the comparisons and ensuing debates over old to new and import to domestic can begin in earnest.

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46 minutes ago, Brewmaster said:

So after reviewing most of this latest attempt of a new iteration of the "thread from hell" I still haven't been able to cut through the bs, hyperbole, and stone cold vindictiveness to determine if Made in the USA Hamers are going to be made again or not. A simple yes or no would suffice. 

I know, I know, I  rear my ugly old head only once in a blue moon only to stir up shit by asking for a simple response to a simple request. 

 

Nice to hear from you! It's like old home week!

I suspect much of the brouhaha (Brewhaha?) was due to the perceived unlikelihood of the question raised in the original post being definitively answered. 

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17 minutes ago, jwhitcomb3 said:

Nice to hear from you! It's like old home week!

I suspect much of the brouhaha (Brewhaha?) was due to the perceived unlikelihood of the question raised in the original post being definitively answered. 

Jon, same here.  

and guess what? The main question still hasn't been answered. One can hope somewhere along the line the new owners of the name will at least try a special edition of one of the models to test the waters to see if any kind of a formal USA re-launch would be feasible.

 

 

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14 minutes ago, Brewmaster said:

and guess what? The main question still hasn't been answered.

Which should come as a surprise to no one.

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7 minutes ago, MCChris said:

Which should come as a surprise to no one.

So same ol', same ol'.......and we go round and round and round in the circle game. (Circle jerk?) 

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Just now, Brewmaster said:

So same ol', same ol'.......and we go round and round and round in the circle game. (Circle jerk?) 

I was about to type "without the guitars we need to hang our hats on something connected to the past" but the guitars have in fact come back (albeit imports only).

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I don't know....

I'm pretty sure I answered the question on Page 1.  I can't help it if the point doesn't sink in or people insist on fantasizing.  

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1 hour ago, Brewmaster said:

@Devrock Yes, but imports. 

I have nothing against well made imports, the ones coming out of the World Musical Instruments company in South Korea are a great value. I have a Zach Meyers PRS SE from there that is a great guitar and a Chinese Ibanez AS 153 that is also well made. They aren't USA models and therein lies the rub.

I want to see who would make them here and the price point. I don't care if any old Hamer guys are involved or not. There are many skilled people available who can make them just as well as the old crew. Then the comparisons and ensuing debates over old to new and import to domestic can begin in earnest.

I'm guessing if they made no mention of a USA line, then there's your answer. Has Karan EVER made guitars here? I don't believe so. I, too, have zero interest in any imports.

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2 minutes ago, devrock said:

I'm guessing if they made no mention of a USA line, then there's your answer.

Seemed pretty obvious to me as well.

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                                                         No USA built Hamer guitars,we all got what they made and anything made now is not the original brand.You want a great USA built Hamer?.................buy one used.

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8 hours ago, cmatthes said:

Well, FMIC sold KMC to JAM Industries - Kaman is still thriving in the Defense/Aerospace sector! ;)

Smart-Ass. :P Strum this!

2683395918_ffcfcf2d9e.jpg

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On 1/22/2017 at 11:12 AM, murkat said:

 

Last day of Namm, check.

Page 19, check.

I think we stayed tuned....  :ph34r:

What's the word.

The word is troll.

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On 1/22/2017 at 11:19 AM, ARM OF HAMER said:

                                              http://www.musicradar.com/news/guitars/namm-2017-hamer-guitars-is-back-back-back-647353 Quote. "Now this great iconic brand returns to NAMM to meet the pent up demand from a new generation of players with exact reissues of the most popular models Hamer has been selling for over 20 years." :huh:

Pent up demand? More like "answering a question no one's asking."

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Ok, they seem to address the heavy rock market. That's where guitars are still in play.

Did I get it right? The trem driven sunburst is long scale? Would be an interesting snatch.

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those aren't made in Korea, are they? not for $800? 20 years ago MIK was decent. Now it's at a whole new level, and Korean labor isn't as cheap as it used to be. I've bought two recent MIK guitars - a Schecter and a Steinberger, and at this point, the only limiting factor (if any) is the quality and age of the wood being used. I make it a point to try out Gibsons whenever I visit the mega guitar emporium and have yet to find one that was worth a damn.

Epiphones are now made in China; Korea got too expensive. Even with the same technology in their factories, you still have to pay for skilled labor.

And yet as impressive as the fit and finish is on these recent MIK guitars, you don't get what Mike Shishkov pointed out - "reading the wood". Concert violinist Joshua Bell has said that his $4 million Stradivarius adds about 10% over a well-made modern violin...but being a serious musician, that 10% matters a lot, so scraping up $4 million in a hurry was of utmost importance. For most hobbyists, and even a fair number of professional rock musicians, that extra 10% of synergy between the different pieces of wood in the instrument won't matter and it's hard to hear or feel. The kind of quality that Hamer epitomized in its heyday can really only be appreciated by, say, studio musicians, the Eric Johnsons of the world, TGP cork sniffers...

for what its worth, I've come to believe that the wood stash matters a great deal. In terms of mass-production guitars, brand new PRS electrics and Taylor acoustics have mojo. I'm sure their craftsmen are experienced and skilled, but they're also using exceptional wood. I've recently been considering buying a Taylor, and it'll be worth the $3500 or so it'll cost.

but we're here on this board because we are passionately in love with that Hamer mojo. That's why its reintroduction into the market has caused an emotional furor; those guitars are NOT Hamers, not the way we think of a musical instrument as a Hamer. I am thankful that Mike is continuing the tradition; Hamer (by our definition) was resurrected when he started making guitars and since he started accepting custom orders, "Hamer" is definitely alive and well...and it ain't hanging on a rack at NAMM.

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1 hour ago, tobereeno said:

what Mike Shishkov pointed out - "reading the wood". Concert violinist Joshua Bell has said that his $4 million Stradivarius adds about 10% over a well-made modern violin...

So, Shish has limited wood literacy? B)

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5 minutes ago, gorch said:

 

So, Shish has limited wood literacy? B)

quite the opposite. mass-production can make a "perfect" guitar...in terms of an object. however, to get the whole thing working together and become a singular sum greater than its parts, you need an expert luthier and a much more hands-on construction method, as every piece of wood is different and it takes a sensitive human touch to discern the subtle differences. if musical instruments were made of 100% synthetic materials, I'd want it made by a high-precision machine. There are carbon fiber instruments and the more they're handbuilt, the more cost is unnecessarily built into them. But wood is still the material of choice (I recently did some research on this), and from an engineering point of view, composites approach the best woods but don't exceed them. So guys like Shish are still very much needed!

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