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I always get choked up...or perhaps even weep...whenever I listen to----


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The Living Years gets me too.  Your no "wuss".  Just a man with a heart.  Doesn't mean you won't punch somebody in the face, if they are deserving of a proper beating.

"Under Pressure" gets me sometimes. But the my ultimate tear jerker song is "Cats in the Cradle", Harry Chapin. I lost my little brother Brian in July. Was only 42. I can't imagine how my dad feels no

"You'll be in My Heart" - Phil Collins - Disney's Tarzan soundtrack. I'm a wuss, I know. The movie came out just after my Dad died. We were watching it (my kids were still little then) and when that s

Second Best, by Pedro the Lion. You've never heard it. 

Also The Night, by Morphine. If you're in the mood for a song about death from someone's final album...

And this...

 

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"Vrbana Bridge" by Jill Sobule, about two young lovers caught in the war in Sarajevo.  They were attempting to cross the bridge to freedom when snipers shot them.  He was killed instantly, but she wasn't, and crawled over to his body and died with him.  The song gives me chills every time.  She has a way with a tear-jerker - "Mexican Wrestler" and "Super 8" get me as well.

 

"White Wine In The Sun" by Tim Minchin.  I have to be careful where I listen to this, because it chokes me up every single time unless I'm sufficiently distracted.  The family images just hit me harder as I get older, especially because my daughter lives away now.

 

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Waters can really effect me. This was suggested for our Floyd tribute but I cant get through it. Written from the perspective of an airman falling out of a plane. Unreal

 

Edited by it's me HHB
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Perhaps some might find it trite, but for me, it's most of the verses in "Time" by Pink Floyd and Harry Chapin's "Cat's in the Cradle"--especially as my kids are growing up and moving out. 

Strangely, once in a while I'll hear "Down to the Waterline" by Dire Straits, and when that last verse comes around and Knopfler makes reference to the now-much-older-girlfriend feeling nostalgic/melancholy about the places she and the boyfriend trod, it will touch an emotional nerve.  "Brothers in Arms" is pretty damn emotional, too.

The common thread seems to be getting older and realizing one's youth is long gone. 

Edited by Biz Prof
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"Cry for You"  - Andy Timmons

"The Class of '57" - Statler Bros 

+1 "Cat's in the Cradle" - Harry Chapin

"The common thread seems to be getting older and realizing one's youth is long gone."  Biz Prof

With the exception of the instrumental by Timmons - exactly.    

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2 hours ago, Hamerica said:

"Cry for You"  - Andy Timmons

"The Class of '57" - Statler Bros 

+1 "Cat's in the Cradle" - Harry Chapin

"The common thread seems to be getting older and realizing one's youth is long gone."  Biz Prof

With the exception of the instrumental by Timmons - exactly.    

I made em cry because of intrumentals for 20 years in BBD 😆

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One that really gets me is Elvin Bishops FOOLED AROUND AND FELL IN LOVE. Best touch dancin tune on the planet IMO.  Just love that balls to the wall guitar solo man.

 

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Cat's in the Cradle is a tough one.  And once, long ago, when I was a dishwasher at a Pizza Hut, for some reason the Cars' Drive came on and the tears started rolling.  I wasn't bawling or making any noise, but that song just hit me in that way at that time.  I still think it's a beautiful song to this day.

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If you're a grown-ass man who wears cargo shorts, plays fantasy football and enjoys superhero movies, this song should shake you to your core and make you weep for sure:

 

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"Be Still": Doyle Dykes. Final (and only vocal) song on his brilliant Chameleon album, which includes a U2 medley, "While My Guitar Gently Weeps", and a Coldplay medley.

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On 9/29/2019 at 4:33 PM, it's me HHB said:

Waters can really effect me. This was suggested for our Floyd tribute but I cant get through it. Written from the perspective of an airman falling out of a plane. Unreal

 

Funny, "Final Cut" of that same album does that to me.  The guitar solo kills me, but the lyrics are just heavy.  I identify with them way too closely.  If you ever hear that song playing in my car or house, I am definitely in the middle of going through some shit because I never listen to it otherwise. 

I have a whole playlist for this.  About once a year, I pull out a bunch a favs, drink too much, and wallow in self pity.  I guess leaning into it with full force and doing it all at once every now and then is better than always having it on simmer in the background. 

"I Know" - Fiona Apple
"I Hate These Songs" - Dale Watson
"Fake Plastic Trees" - Radiohead
"Cover Me Up" - Jason Isbell 

Those all get me.  I get a catch just typing their names. 

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  • 9 months later...
On 9/30/2019 at 5:28 AM, Biz Prof said:

Perhaps some might find it trite, but for me, it's most of the verses in "Time" by Pink Floyd and Harry Chapin's "Cat's in the Cradle"--especially as my kids are growing up and moving out. 

Strangely, once in a while I'll hear "Down to the Waterline" by Dire Straits, and when that last verse comes around and Knopfler makes reference to the now-much-older-girlfriend feeling nostalgic/melancholy about the places she and the boyfriend trod, it will touch an emotional nerve.  "Brothers in Arms" is pretty damn emotional, too.

The common thread seems to be getting older and realizing one's youth is long gone. 

I'm 66 now and had a tough 2019 in and out of the hospital plus a stroke that seems to have turned me into a "sentimental old fool." When I dropped digital for vinyl, it amped up the tear factory. I find the analog signal chain and my refining tweaks to have an emotional impact I seldom had in digital. I grew up in a simple Evangelical Christian home. My parents were born in 1909 and 1912 and grew up in rural Illinois. When I was listening to "Down to the River to Pray" on the O Brother, Where Art Thou? soundtrack, it evoked an overwhelming wave of nostalgia. My dad died in 1982. I remember him telling me he was 6 years old when he was baptized in an Illinois river because his church was too poor to have a built-in baptistry in their church building. When gathering outdoors on a riverbank for baptisms, the congregation sang "Shall We Gather at the River?" instead of "As I Went Down in the River to Pray." He said he was so small at the time that the pastor baptizing him held him up so his feet didn't touch the river bottom. So I had a close relationship with someone who had a near identical experience to the river scene and song depicted in the film and on the record. The baptism scene and its soundtrack in "O Brother Where Art Thou?" turns on my waterworks every time.
 

Edited by JohnnyB
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Friday I'd been a bit sluggish and needed to straighten up the kitchen so I put on an album that featured a single I used to listen to on my AM clock radio when I was 12--"Got My Mojo Workin'" by Hammond organ jazz/R&B master Jimmy Smith:

This was 1965, when The Beatles' "Help" and "Rubber Soul" topped the charts. I liked The Beatles, but Jimmy's Hammond organ technique really lit me up every time.

My mom was our church organist and played a Hammond C3 there. It was electronically identical to Jimmy's B3 but the resemblance ended there. So... talk about a nostalgia trip...I was 12 when I was listening to this and it just energized me and made me feel like I'd run into an old friend.

If it hadn't been for Jimmy Smith, would we have had Booker T., Lee Michaels, the organ lead in Santana's "Soul Sacrifice,"  Jimmy McGriff, and James Brown's manic organ breaks?

When I was in high school, I had a friend who played organ. He had a Rheem organ with draw bars and a maple-finish Leslie Tone Cabinet. With his rig he could definitely cop the R&B Hammond sound. He entered a battle of the bands and recruited me to play drums. Our entries were covers of Santana's "Soul Sacrifice" and Booker T. and the MGs' "Time is Tight." That was a lot of fun!

Edited by JohnnyB
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