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Try This At Home


Steve Haynie

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23 hours ago, cmatthes said:

Was that at one of the Stevensville clinics?  I recall hearing that same advice from him!

Concert in Pittsburgh.  I was hoping that he did it on one of his live DVDs, but I don't remember seeing it on any of them.  It reminded me of the old Monty Python skit "How To Do It".

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One bar at a time, starting with the last.

Learn the last bar, then add the second to last bar. Then add bars at the beginning of what you’re learning, and practice is cumulative.

With this method you’ll constantly reinforce the piece and it’s actually stronger in your memory and technique as you actually play it.

If you do it the opposite way, you run the risk of having a strong beginning, and you’ve spent the least amount of time on the end of the piece. For example a LOT of guitar players know the intros to a ton of songs and none all the way through...

I had an awesome and terrifying teacher in college who was in Segovia’s master classes. I was preparing for a recital of Bach violin partitas etc, and I came in to have him help me prepare. He said, “What have ya got?”, and I said, “Well I’ve worked on the A section of each of these and...” He laughed out loud and said, “Well, then you’ll have a really great recital of all ‘A sections’! Hahahaha!” 😳

I never forgot that... 😆

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1 hour ago, geoff_hartwell said:

One bar at a time, starting with the last.

Learn the last bar, then add the second to last bar. Then add bars at the beginning of what you’re learning, and practice is cumulative.

With this method you’ll constantly reinforce the piece and it’s actually stronger in your memory and technique as you actually play it.

If you do it the opposite way, you run the risk of having a strong beginning, and you’ve spent the least amount of time on the end of the piece. For example a LOT of guitar players know the intros to a ton of songs and none all the way through...

I don't think that's true.  Not at all.  I mean...

 

Well, look at it this way, if you practice the songs from the end...

 

Does anybody really stop trying to learn a song after playing the ope...

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2 hours ago, geoff_hartwell said:

I had an awesome and terrifying teacher in college who was in Segovia’s master classes.

Extremely envious! I’ve been a fan of Andre since I was a kid. One of the first classical pieces I learned was his arrangement of the Bourrée in Em! 

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