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I think the Fraxinus uhdei species is also called "Tropical Ash", though there isn't a huge amount of information out there on it, when compared to White Ash, Black. Ash, etc.

It's gotta a LOT more sunny on my drive to work over the past few years, due to the death and removal of ash trees. There were 4-5 yards in a row which had a great canopy cover, which is now totally gone, because it was entirely made of ash trees.

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50 minutes ago, tbonesullivan said:

I think the Fraxinus uhdei species is also called "Tropical Ash", though there isn't a huge amount of information out there on it, when compared to White Ash, Black. Ash, etc.

It's gotta a LOT more sunny on my drive to work over the past few years, due to the death and removal of ash trees. There were 4-5 yards in a row which had a great canopy cover, which is now totally gone, because it was entirely made of ash trees.

Thanks for sending me down the correct path!  Oh well, so much for the Wood Database.  :rolleyes:   I wasn't able to find out much about Shamel Ash/Tropical Ash as far as how it's used, though this might be a start:

https://www.cabi.org/isc/datasheet/24559

Economic Value

As a timber tree, F. uhdei provides a valuable, medium density (0.5 g/cm3), pale brown wood with a straight grain and moderately fine texture (Shukla and Sangal, 1980). The wood is used mainly for cabinetwork, furniture, moulding and panelling, but it is also suitable for boat building, craftwood, flooring, interior trim, joinery poles, particleboards, pulpwood, plywood, structural sawnwood and veneer. It is easy to season, machine and finish but is susceptible to blue stain, Lyctus borers and termites. The sapwood is permeable to preservatives and the heartwood is moderately resistant.

In its native range, F. uhdei has been selectively logged but it is not a prime timber species. In Chiapas, Mexico, it has been grown in hedgerows for wood and fuel. In plantations, F. uhdei has high survival and rapid initial growth on favourable sites, but often exhibits uneven growth rates across sites, poor form and has a tendency to lodge. F. uhdei is relatively shade tolerant and can regenerate by coppicing (Walters and Wick, 1973). In Hawaii, F. uhdei has higher growth rates in relatively deep soils derived from volcanic ash than in shallow, stony organic soils. Timber yields in Hawaii and Puerto Rico have ranged between 4.1 and 11.5 m3/ha/year. 

Social Benefit

F. uhdei is planted as an ornamental street or shade tree in its native range and has been introduced as such in California, Hawaii and elsewhere. It is considered to have attractive leaves.

Uhdenoside, a secoiridoid dilactone isolated from leaves of F. uhdei, has potential applications in natural medicine (Shen et al., 1995).

Environmental Services

In the 1920s, F. uhdei was planted extensively in Hawaii for watershed protection (Harrington and Ewell, 1997).

Uses List

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Environmental

  • Amenity
  • Landscape improvement
  • Windbreak

Fuels

  • Fuelwood

Materials

  • Wood/timber

Medicinal, pharmaceutical

  • Source of medicine/pharmaceutical

Ornamental

  • garden plant

Wood Products

Top of page

Boats

  •  

Furniture

  •  

Pulp

  • Short-fibre pulp

Roundwood

  • Pit props
  • Posts
  • Stakes

Sawn or hewn building timbers

  • Carpentry/joinery (exterior/interior)
  • Flooring
  • For light construction
  • Wall panelling

Veneers

  •  

Wood-based materials

  • Fibreboard
  • Hardboard
  • Medium density fibreboard
  • Particleboard
  • Plywood

Woodware

  • Cutlery
  • Industrial and domestic woodware
  • Sports equipment
  • Tool handles
  • Toys
  • Turnery
  • Wood carvings
Edited by crunchee
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8 hours ago, Steve Haynie said:

Someone ought to go get that oak tree that Gary Rossington ran into that is mentioned in That Smell and make a limited run of guitars out of it.  It is still standing, and there is a video of the tree on youtube. 

Gee, what a great idea!

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