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DaveL

Interesting new gibson 70’s v’s and explorers

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https://www.gearnews.com/namm-2020-gibson-original-collection-classic-v-and-explorer-authentic-70s-tone/

Not exactly like mike.    The schenker, accept v’s all had rounded headstocks but step in the right direction... especially after the Henry foolishness  

image.jpeg

 

Edited by DaveL
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Yes, deffo the right step. The headstock doesn't look right on the V, but that's a nitpick on my side. The Explorer looks great.

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Oh wow... lotta people are gonna go nuts over these.  Was this before the "Dirty Fingers" and "velvet brick" era?  Because I can see James Hetfield fans snatching up those cream flying V's like hotcakes.

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"Both models come in a white-on-white look for the nitrocellulose finish and pickguard, with matching headstocks."

...except in the photo.  

Gibson-Original-Series-Classic-V-and-Exp

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They still insist on that crappy late '80s/early '90s Explorer body shape.  They REALLY should do a more accurate '70s/early '80s body - that sharp point bugs the hell outta me.

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Looks like they took a 67 V and stick a 70's guard on it. I mean I like the look, but if that's all they did then WTF. 

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2 hours ago, cmatthes said:

They REALLY should do a more accurate '70s/early '80s body - that sharp point bugs the hell outta me.

Sad that they don't even know how to make tributes to their own guitars.

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Maybe they want to save money by using one CNC program for all Explorer bodies.

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The Historic ones use the correct body shape.

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45 minutes ago, cmatthes said:

The Historic ones use the correct body shape.

EF81EFCB-1453-4C41-91DA-0168A4EEF667.png

Yep, I gotta admit this shape looks much better. I hate the upper button locations on the Explorer and 58V RIs, though. Makes for an awkward hang. 

Edited by RobB
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That headstock on the V is a no go for me.  Period correct it isn't.

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I wonder how many parts of wood are glued together under that finish?

I looked at one of these new Explorers the other week. It had a three or four piece body. Did not look all that great up close. Kinda sloppy put together with very visible seams between the parts.

highres_DSX19ANCH1_1.jpg

 

 

The other guitarist in my band bought one of these new Vee's recently. Almost unplayed, from someone who got it in a trade from a music store. It's an okay vee. But it also looks a bit cheap up close with visible seams. More than two pieces of wood in the body. And the mahogany, or what ever kinda wood it is...?, does not look nearly as great as the mahogany used in my 1991 Les Paul classic, or any of my Hamer's for that matter - but they are in a class of their own.

front-banner-1600_900.png

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Hold a Gibson Explorer in the light to see if the body is truly flat.  Quite often it is not.  Either the wood has settled or the finish has somehow flowed into high and low spots. 

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11 hours ago, Disturber said:

I wonder how many parts of wood are glued together under that finish?

I looked at one of these new Explorers the other week. It had a three or four piece body. Did not look all that great up close. Kinda sloppy put together with very visible seams between the parts.

 

5 hours ago, Steve Haynie said:

Hold a Gibson Explorer in the light to see if the body is truly flat.  Quite often it is not.  Either the wood has settled or the finish has somehow flowed into high and low spots. 

On a solid color non-transparent finish (or even on a transparent finish), the trick is to look at the reflection of the light in the finish, not just the body itself.  If you see a dead-straight line (or lines, since there may be more than two pieces of wood involved) running the length of the body in the reflection, 99 times out of 100 it's a seam from two pieces of wood glued together under the finish; and keep in mind that there are rarely any dead-straight lines in nature, if not at all.  When I look at any guitar with a solid-color finish I do that.  Once a guitar is glued, assembled, painted, and clear-coated, the finish starts to settle and cure, and it's nearly impossible to hide the seam(s), no matter how many times the wood is sanded and filled.

Edited by crunchee
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THIS is the last of the correct Gibson Explorers.

B7B17FB4-2B51-4AAF-8C7D-DA2CDB6750AB.jpeg

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