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In November 1970, Cat Stevens came out with a pretty incredible album, Tea For The Tillerman. For those of a certain age, a lot of good times were had with that music.

So coming in September 2020, Cat Stevens (now as Yusuf Islam) is releasing Tea For The Tillerman2 .

https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B088VXBWDM/?coliid=I2CMLBWZABY3RP&colid=3RNG3YY1TBSBW&psc=1&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it

Same songs, same order as the original. I'm actually looking forward to hearing it. There's not too many other records I'd be interested in hearing 50 years later by the same artist. Any you can think of? 

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2 hours ago, specialk said:

In November 1970, Cat Stevens came out with a pretty incredible album, Tea For The Tillerman. For those of a certain age, a lot of good times were had with that music.

So coming in September 2020, Cat Stevens (now as Yusuf Islam) is releasing Tea For The Tillerman2 .

https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B088VXBWDM/?coliid=I2CMLBWZABY3RP&colid=3RNG3YY1TBSBW&psc=1&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it

Same songs, same order as the original. I'm actually looking forward to hearing it. There's not too many other records I'd be interested in hearing 50 years later by the same artist. Any you can think of? 

Sgt. Pepper (53 yrs), Abbey Road (51 yrs), Revolver (54), A Hard Day's night (56), Surrealistic Pillow (53), Days of Future Passed (53), The Doors self-titled, 53), Beach Boys "Smiley Smile (53 yrs),   Creedence Clearwater Revival from Self-titled (52 yrs), Bayou Country (51), Wily and the Poor Boys (51), Cosmo's Factory and Pendulum (50 yrs ea.), etc. The '60s exploded with rock, pop, and folk-rock.

Cat Stevens was on Deram Records in 1967 (same label as The Moody Blues at the time, and then on Island and A&M from 1970-78. They made superb-sounding records and Cat was writing and performing some great songs.

I saw Rod Stewart in concert in 2006. He did a cover of Stevens' "Fathers and Sons" performed in front of a projected backdrop of pictures of Rod as a boy and his father. It was a touching presentation and really brought out the heart of Stevens' gifted songwriting.

Edited by JohnnyB
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All great albums you mentioned Johnny. I'm just not sure I'd like to hear remakes of those. With this one, I'm hoping his life experiences (whatever those are) inform the lyrics with new and added emphasis on other things one may not have realized before.

Hell, now I even got myself confused there. Jeez… 😃

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Andy Timmons Band and Cheap Trick did great interpretations of Sgt Peppers in their own ways.

Would I like to hear artists re-do their own albums?  Nah. That's what concerts are for.

But I do like the enhanced, remixed/remastered versions of classic albums, the medley mix interpretation format of the Cirque de Soleil Beatles Love, single artists doing albums of covers of songs they like and albums of artists covering one band.

 

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I'm not sure that I want to hear songs redone by the original artists (or at least by those still living, or in authorized reincarnations) 50+ years after the fact.  If that's your cuppa coffee, you can always catch the Doo Wop or the Sixties specials on PBS during 'Pledge Week'.

do like redone songs that are 'better' (IMO) than the 'originals'.  For instance, the 'original':

 

The remake:

 

Of course, the song (especially the first version) is basically a ripoff of the 'Bo Diddley beat'...which Bo Diddley continued to use in variations of some of his songs, most famously in "Who Do You Love", which George Thorogood basically built his career on:

 

For even more fun, include this song (*cough* rip off *cough*) in a medley mashup:

 

Edited by crunchee
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Somewhere in my collection is an album by the Troggs.  The whole thing is different recordings of their old songs, but my assumption is that the songs were recorded within a few years of the original releases.  Chances are the new recordings of the original arrangements were done to get new performance copyrights which would allow them to make money that they might not have been seeing from the originals.  That is only speculation. 

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3 hours ago, crunchee said:

 

 

 

 

Wow. I did not know you could even hang a bass that high...

he’s completely circumventing the arm contour...

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59 minutes ago, Travis said:

Wow. I did not know you could even hang a bass that high...

he’s completely circumventing the arm contour...

 

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12 hours ago, mudshark said:

 

I mean, I know I wear my guitars high. But that’s to mimic the classical position I play in while seated. Hanging a guitar that high would turn the belly cut into a boob cut, I guess...

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On 6/23/2020 at 7:40 AM, specialk said:

There's not too many other records I'd be interested in hearing 50 years later by the same artist. Any you can think of? 

Not a one.  I don’t see the point. This jag has had FIVE DECADES to come up with 12 songs for an album. It seems like a cheap marketing stunt. 

Edited by RobB
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On 6/23/2020 at 6:55 PM, JohnnyB said:

Sgt. Pepper (53 yrs), Abbey Road (51 yrs)

Coincidence, I came to buy the 2017 re-mix of both albums the other day. Great job of a modern mix on full stereo layout rather than drums and bass on left and guitar and voice on the right as on the originals. The sound is superb respective to age. They’ve done a great job on them. Pressed as 180gr.

Also bought The Tubes and The Underworld LPs. I had been buying a few vintage LPs lately and restarted wet playing as I did in the old times. I’m pretty much back into vinyl at the moment and dig a lot of the old stuff out. Gillan is highly enjoying  too. Actually, I prefer Iron Maiden 1 and Killers over the later ones. Also early Judas Priest.

Having had the later Beatles on as mentioned, I had moved over to ELO 1+2. Except for the voice it sounds almost equal. The Beatles really defined the line for decades.

Does anyone know about Alex Oriental Experience? A German guy having become popular in Turkey in early 70s pop before returning to Germany and taking the Saz instrument into rock? The live album had been a party stable in boarding school in early 80s.

ETA. I like the Queen Innuendo 180gr. re-issue. Although, I can’t remember it had been available on vinyl at the times. It kind of sounds better than the original CD somehow.

Edited by gorch
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KISS rerecorded several of their old songs for the release of Sonic Boom.  It was not an album re-imagined.  I love the music, but it was somewhat odd listening to the "new" band playing the old songs.  The magic happened the first time.  The "new" band still sounded good, though. 

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16 hours ago, Travis said:

Wow. I did not know you could even hang a bass that high...

he’s completely circumventing the arm contour...

Yeah, it looks like he went to the Gerry Marsden School Of Guitar Wearing:

 

I dunno which one of The Strangeloves is Richard Gottehrer (hope it's not the bassist!), but he went on to found Sire Records, and produce acts like Blondie and The Go-Go's, and Marshall Crenshaw's first album.  He also co-wrote "My Boyfriend's Back" in 1963:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Gottehrer

...plus, he co-wrote this little party favorite which should be familiar to any J. Geils Band fan:

 

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47 minutes ago, kizanski said:

If you like this record...

KW5A78ijrTtJYT5jqmpv7Q-650-80.jpg

..and reggae dub...

R-1080196-1190564521.jpeg.jpg

...you need to get that.

 

So, I'm guessing that trying to sync "The Wizard Of Oz" with "Dub Side Of The Moon" isn't the best choice of movie?  Or maybe it is, or maybe whoever's watching it/listening to it won't notice the difference, depending on the audience?  B) :rolleyes: 

Edited by crunchee
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21 hours ago, Travis said:

Wow. I did not know you could even hang a bass that high...

he’s completely circumventing the arm contour...

Yeah, that looks even less graceful than Rick Danko chopping away and pawing at his Gibson Ripper with that awkward spastic motion of his right arm. At least Danko sounded good. 

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On 6/23/2020 at 12:24 PM, specialk said:

All great albums you mentioned Johnny. I'm just not sure I'd like to hear remakes of those. With this one, I'm hoping his life experiences (whatever those are) inform the lyrics with new and added emphasis on other things one may not have realized before.

Hell, now I even got myself confused there. Jeez… 😃

That's pretty likely. When Stevens became a Muslim, he sold his piano and gold records to repudiate his pre-Muslim musical life. He was under the impression that music was ungodly and selfish. Then he learned that the Arabic/Muslim culture not only had a long history of musical instruments, it had also created some of them, such as the oud, a precursor to the lute and guitar...

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...and which is why the guitar became the national instrument of Spain after the Muslim conquest. That history lesson was the catalyst for Stevens to start writing and recording again. And I can imagine he looked back at his older songs and wanted to explore them with his evolved value systems.

When you think about it, the recorded music industry is a tenuous clash between art and commerce. The musicians develop instrumental and vocal skill; the lyricists write poetry that explores human relationships and social issues, and the record label executives establish a record's budget, recording deadline, release date, and predicted cash flow.

Given the musicians' goals of self-expression and communication, how could they record an album within the commerce-driven recording budget, deadline, and release date and not have "woulda-coulda-shoulda" moments? Then, if the recording became a big hit and money-maker, there would probably be a nostalgia market demand, plus an inclination of the artists to have a do-over.

Similarly, most of the early Beatles albums were recorded in two channels, which is not the same as stereo. Two-channel (one track for voices, the other for instrumentation) improved clarity, but was not intended for "stereo."

When the tapes were shipped to Capitol Records in Hollywood, stereo was all the rage in the USA. Stereo records cost more than mono ones, and were priced higher (usually $1/LP more, which would be an extra $8.27 today). So the Capitol engineers used the two-channel tapes to create "stereo" albums with instruments on the hard left and vocals on the hard right. George Martin was furious when Capitol did this.

I have the 2014 EMI analog mono LP remaster/re-release and it has the same effect as a pre-war epic film that was re-released in the '60s with better editing, framing, color saturation, and dialog clarity. The trailers always added "See it like you've never seen it before!" Well, that's what I get when I play the Beatles analog mono EMI/Parlophone LPs--I hear it as I've never heard it before. I come away appreciating The Beatles' creativity in self-taught composing and musicianship. 58 years after their first album, they are still amazing, especially when you hear how quickly they developed as songwriters and musicians in their last several albums.

 

Edited by JohnnyB
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6 hours ago, JohnnyB said:

I have the 2014 EMI analog mono LP remaster/re-release and it has the same effect as a pre-war epic film that was re-released in the '60s with better editing, framing, color saturation, and dialog clarity. The trailers always added "See it like you've never seen it before!" Well, that's what I get when I play the Beatles analog mono EMI/Parlophone LPs--I hear it as I've never heard it before. I come away appreciating The Beatles' creativity in self-taught composing and musicianship. 58 years after their first album, they are still amazing, especially when you hear how quickly developed as songwriters and musicians in their last several albums.

Guy Massey (one of the engineers who worked on the Beatles box sets) said in the Sound On Sound article below:

"The mono was always The Mix. On Pepper they spent three weeks mixing that, and the stereo was done in three days.”

https://www.soundonsound.com/techniques/remastering-beatles

That coincides with what I'd heard before, and not just with Sgt. Pepper...in the beginning, after the original recording sessions were done, George Martin and The Beatles gave the mono mixes the most attention, and the stereo mixes were given less...often assigning the stereo mixes to other engineers.

Edited by crunchee
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16 hours ago, crunchee said:

Guy Massey (one of the engineers who worked on the Beatles box sets) said in the Sound On Sound article below:

"The mono was always The Mix. On Pepper they spent three weeks mixing that, and the stereo was done in three days.”

https://www.soundonsound.com/techniques/remastering-beatles

That coincides with what I'd heard before, and not just with Sgt. Pepper...in the beginning, after the original recording sessions were done, George Martin and The Beatles gave the mono mixes the most attention, and the stereo mixes were given less...often assigning the stereo mixes to other engineers.

The late Geoff Emerick's book, Here, There, and Everywhere,  also reinforces that. IIRC,  the time spent doing the mono mix for Sgt. Pepper was measured in days, and the "stereo" mix was done in hours--about half a day.
Reading that description convinced me to order up the EMI/Parlophone Beatles mono remaster/repress, and I have certainly never regretted that decision.

Edited by JohnnyB
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On 6/23/2020 at 10:40 AM, specialk said:

In November 1970, Cat Stevens came out with a pretty incredible album, Tea For The Tillerman. For those of a certain age, a lot of good times were had with that music.

So coming in September 2020, Cat Stevens (now as Yusuf Islam) is releasing Tea For The Tillerman2 .

https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B088VXBWDM/?coliid=I2CMLBWZABY3RP&colid=3RNG3YY1TBSBW&psc=1&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it

Same songs, same order as the original. I'm actually looking forward to hearing it. There's not too many other records I'd be interested in hearing 50 years later by the same artist. Any you can think of? 

There's a lot of indie albums that I would love to hear redone with better production. Not really in the same vein as what you meant thought I guess.

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2 hours ago, sonic1974 said:

There's a lot of indie albums that I would love to hear redone with better production. Not really in the same vein as what you meant thought I guess.

+1.  Marshall Crenshaw's second album, Field Day (1983) is a murky mess, no thanks to the Steve Lillywhite production. 

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3 hours ago, crunchee said:

+1.  Marshall Crenshaw's second album, Field Day (1983) is a murky mess, no thanks to the Steve Lillywhite production. 

Isn't he a big time mixer? Maybe it was at the beginning of his career, ha. Not familiar with that band, only know the name. Southern rock? Maybe i'm thinking of someone else. 

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