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On 10/6/2020 at 4:22 PM, atomicwash said:

I bought Van Halen I on 8-track.

RIP Eddie.

I still have the first four on 8-track.  I'm old.

22 hours ago, gorch said:

That was a really nice fantasy actually. B)
Another StarFleet so to say.

When I went to bed last night, I turned on SiriusXM's tribute channel.  Star Fleet was one of the first songs I heard them play.  

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Felt the need to scribble this off last night: *** In 1979, I was at a very impressionable stage of my life. I was 12, and my family had moved to a home a couple blocks away from Fiddler’s,

EVH is blasting loud in the shop tonight.    My brother never knew how often I would sneak in and play a bootlegged Van Halen tape that he had gotten ahold of, once I figured out how to work his

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22 hours ago, gorch said:

???

What is the influence of Malmsteen, please?

Well, Malmsteen was the very cause of the second wave of shredders in the eighties. All the Shrapnel prodigies, including Jason Becker, Marty Friedman, Tony McAlpine, Paul Gilbert, Vinnie Moore and the likes, were a byproduct of Malmsteen’s influence to some extent. Also, in the power metal, in the death metal and in the prog metal genres, shredders heavily stole from Malmsteen and still do to this day —John Petrucci, Jeff Loomis, Steve Smyth, Henjo Richter, Andy Larocque... So, he might be a narcissistic jerk, but his neoclassical influences went everywhere and impacted the rock guitar world as much as Van Halen did in 1979, although Malmsteen’s commercial success was way less important than EVH’s. That’s why I see Malmsteen as a milestone in the development of the stylistic idioms of modern electric guitar. The other two who had such a huge impact were Jimi Hendrix and, of course, Eddie Van Halen —and the later might be the greatest rock guitarist ever, yes. 

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EVH Commemorates 40th Anniversary of Van Halen II with '79 Bumblebee  Tribute Guitar

I saw Eddie in Kansas City, MO. during Mar. 1978 on the first VH World Tour! VH warmed up for Ronnie Montrose (supporting the album 'Open Fire') and Journey (on their first tour with Steve Perry). Eddie was mainly still playing the blue and yellow guitar. Awesome show, probably $7- for tickets.

LONG LIVE EVH!

Edited by topekatj
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6 hours ago, zorrow said:

Well, Malmsteen was the very cause of the second wave of shredders in the eighties. All the Shrapnel prodigies, including Jason Becker, Marty Friedman, Tony McAlpine, Paul Gilbert, Vinnie Moore and the likes, were a byproduct of Malmsteen’s influence to some extent. Also, in the power metal, in the death metal and in the prog metal genres, shredders heavily stole from Malmsteen and still do to this day —John Petrucci, Jeff Loomis, Steve Smyth, Henjo Richter, Andy Larocque... So, he might be a narcissistic jerk, but his neoclassical influences went everywhere and impacted the rock guitar world as much as Van Halen did in 1979, although Malmsteen’s commercial success was way less important than EVH’s. That’s why I see Malmsteen as a milestone in the development of the stylistic idioms of modern electric guitar. The other two who had such a huge impact were Jimi Hendrix and, of course, Eddie Van Halen —and the later might be the greatest rock guitarist ever, yes. 

Wow. I would have never imagined.

So, what's the influence of Brian May in comparison then? B)

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1 hour ago, gorch said:

Wow. I would have never imagined.

So, what's the influence of Brian May in comparison then? B)

Brian May played (or plays?) in an extremely popular band, and we all know his unique tone, his classy touch, his melodic taste and his guitar orchestrations are his signature. He contributed to the development of the vocabulary of heavy metal and even was doing tapping way before than EVH. He has been influential for sure. However, he never produced millions of imitators worldwide, all stunned by his stage antics, his sound and his technical prowess. In contrast, EVH and Malmsteen did.

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I'm still in mourning... I'm sure it'll wear off eventually. It's weird because nobody around me understands, so I have to commiserate with all the old guys online by reading and watching tributes. It's group therapy for me.

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Since we're already four mentions of Malmsteen in on this thread I won't consider this a true hijack....but to set the record straight...

Malmsteen's influence was mostly limited to a handful of people that already played guitar.

I'm a fan so I'm glad to see anyone here claim him as an influence, but in the grand scheme he was barely a gnat on Eddie's ass.  My 80 year old mother could pick Jimi and Eddie out in a crowd.  She wouldn't know Malmsteen if he had his 😇 in her mouth.

Edited by cynic
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7 hours ago, zorrow said:

Brian May played (or plays?) in an extremely popular band, and we all know his unique tone, his classy touch, his melodic taste and his guitar orchestrations are his signature. He contributed to the development of the vocabulary of heavy metal and even was doing tapping way before than EVH. He has been influential for sure. However, he never produced millions of imitators worldwide, all stunned by his stage antics, his sound and his technical prowess. In contrast, EVH and Malmsteen did.

You are right listing the attributes that make him a significant influence. And the number of imitators as you say don‘t disqualify him from being influential, really standing out, not only to listeners but also for players.

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And then we wouldn't have had Malmsteen without Blackmore, so... Fuck. What a tangled web we weave, eh? 🙂

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Now, I just need to find out why getting a CD copy of Diver Down is so freakin impossible. It's been on backorder everywhere for a year or more now. When I picked up every DLR Van halen album, it was the one I could never find.

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2 hours ago, tbonesullivan said:

Now, I just need to find out why getting a CD copy of Diver Down is so freakin impossible. It's been on backorder everywhere for a year or more now. When I picked up every DLR Van halen album, it was the one I could never find.

There's a store that sells used CDs near me that has a few copies - original and remastered.

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2 minutes ago, alantig said:

There's a store that sells used CDs near me that has a few copies - original and remastered.

I can find some on ebay, though right now it's hard to find ANY van halen albums. I will probably need to wait for a few months for the market to calm down.

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Just now, tbonesullivan said:

I can find some on ebay, though right now it's hard to find ANY van halen albums. I will probably need to wait for a few months for the market to calm down.

I was kind of surprised - the first store I went to had a bunch.  Went to another of their locations the next day, they had about four.

Check Barnes & Noble.  If I recall, all or most of the VH catalog w/DLR was in the $4.99 or $7.99 bin.

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1 minute ago, alantig said:

I was kind of surprised - the first store I went to had a bunch.  Went to another of their locations the next day, they had about four.

Check Barnes & Noble.  If I recall, all or most of the VH catalog w/DLR was in the $4.99 or $7.99 bin.

Tried that already... temporarily out of stock. It's not a HUGE deal. My favorite albums are Van Halen and 1984 by far, but I would like to have all of the studio albums, and that's the one I don't have from the DLR era.

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The prices on EVH guitars are truly hilarious right now.  Lot of people about to learn a hard lesson that any of us who bought comics back in the 90s learned about all those chrome "limited edition" covers. 

Edited by LucSulla
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On 10/22/2020 at 12:25 AM, LucSulla said:

The prices on EVH guitars are truly hilarious right now.  Lot of people about to learn a hard lesson that any of us who bought comics back in the 90s learned about all those chrome "limited edition" covers. 

I just posted this in the "C'mon man" guitars ad thread, but it probably belongs here more.  Craziness from FB marketplace:

Screen Shot 2020-10-19 at 10.37.49 AM.png

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1 hour ago, tommy p said:

I just posted this in the "C'mon man" guitars ad thread, but it probably belongs here more.  Craziness from FB marketplace:

Screen Shot 2020-10-19 at 10.37.49 AM.png

I could probably be convinced to sell at that price.

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On 10/8/2020 at 5:09 PM, cynic said:

Since we're already four mentions of Malmsteen in on this thread I won't consider this a true hijack....but to set the record straight...

Malmsteen's influence was mostly limited to a handful of people that already played guitar.

I'm a fan so I'm glad to see anyone here claim him as an influence, but in the grand scheme he was barely a gnat on Eddie's ass.  My 80 year old mother could pick Jimi and Eddie out in a crowd.  She wouldn't know Malmsteen if he had his 😇 in her mouth.

Going to have to agree with this.  I hang out on a guitar forum for an extinct brand (as far as I'm concerned), have spent god knows how much money on gear in my life, played in bands for two decades, and even taught a rock and roll history course for years.  Yet, to this day, I don't think I've ever listened to a Malmsteen song all the way through.   In contrast, I could sing all the lyrics to Panama and knew what tapping and whammy bars were by the time I was four because of Eddie.

I'm not saying Yngwie doesn't matter; he does, but mostly only to other guitar geeks.  The distance between him and Eddie is vast though.  You can argue that without EVH, guitar rock may have petered out as a cultural force 25 years earlier than it did.  I heard a story about a GC assistant manager melting down over Eddie's credit card not working at one he went to all the time.  The manager came down a said, "Don't worry about it.  Just let him leave with it.  He'll pay us back later, and besides, without him, Guitar Centers probably wouldn't exist."

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