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The following artists have ultimately established their own proprietary music genre:


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Rush: "Hard progressive"?

Steely Dan: "Intellectual rock'"? Tears For Fears might also fit into this category but they could be perceived as too, er, emotional...

Mother's Finest: "Power funk" (I've seen this used, as well as "funk rock") Founded in 1972. To what extent have the RHCPs acknowledged any influence?

Johnny A.: Darned if I know what his stuff should be called...(was listening to One November Night earlier today, which inspired this post)

YMMV

Others?

 

 

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Did Metallica create death metal or not?  I never heard anyone else crank their amps the same way.  Black Sabbath and Judas Priest were the heaviest bands I listened to.  Metallica was so cranked up with gain that it was different.  The percussive thumps of the guitars sounded different.  Sliding into a chord, or not so ghostly ghost notes was another trait of Metallica that made them stand out. 

Either a new sound was going on with record companies starting to pull in bands that sounded like Metallica once they caught on, or Metallica happened to be band with that sound that stood out the most. 

My opinion is that Metallica created a new genre of metal.  Today I can hear the influence of Hetfield's vocal style in new music that sounds entirely different. 

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8 minutes ago, Rich_S said:

I thought the Grateful Dead would be first on this list.

Yes - The "Music to hang yourself out of boredom" genre.

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3 hours ago, Steve Haynie said:

Did Metallica create death metal or not?  I never heard anyone else crank their amps the same way.  Black Sabbath and Judas Priest were the heaviest bands I listened to.  Metallica was so cranked up with gain that it was different.  The percussive thumps of the guitars sounded different.  Sliding into a chord, or not so ghostly ghost notes was another trait of Metallica that made them stand out. 

Either a new sound was going on with record companies starting to pull in bands that sounded like Metallica once they caught on, or Metallica happened to be band with that sound that stood out the most. 

My opinion is that Metallica created a new genre of metal.  Today I can hear the influence of Hetfield's vocal style in new music that sounds entirely different. 

I first heard Metallica before they got signed, back when everybody was handing out/trading cassettes in front of the clubs in LA, hoping somebody would hear it and sign them.  They got a record contract I got a song stolen 🤨  They got a bunch heavier by the time the had a commercial release, but you could hear the essence of what they were to become.

 

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18 hours ago, Willie G. Moseley said:

Steely Dan: "Intellectual rock'"? Tears For Fears might also fit into this category but they could be perceived as too, er, emotional...

 

 

 

I am sorry, but I do not recognize the similarity between the music of Steely Dan and that of Tears for Fears.  I love Steely Dan for its jazzy changes, top-shelf guitar solos, and yes, their intelligent lyrics, even though I usually do not pay much attention to lyrics at all, with the exception of Bob Dylan, Ani DiFranco, and the Smiths.  If you are going to compare Steely Dan to a 1980s pop band, I see more in common with the Smiths:  dark, dark brooding lyrics over happy sounding chord progressions.

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1 hour ago, kizanski said:

Yes - The "Music to hang yourself out of boredom" genre.

Although I agree with you that the hour long Drums and Space in concert were pretty boring, I still find Jerry Garcia's solos within the Grateful Dead compelling.  Unlike so many other players at the time, he did not rely on pentatonic scales, and he plays very melodically.  Figuring out his solos for myself really helped me to grow musically.  For fans that were sick of being accused of listening only to the Dead, Jerry also created the Jerry Garcia Band, which played covers.  This is my favourite "Jerry Band" tune, in which he performs the rare trick of playing a cover better than the original (an obvious example of this trick is Jimi Hendrix's version of All Along the Watchtower, which Bob Dylan himself enjoyed so much that he altered his own later performances of this song as a tribute to Jimi.)

Anyway, here is Jerry Garcia's incredible version of Waiting for a Miracle by Bruce Cockburn.  If you take the time to listen to the whole thing, I would be surprised if you do not like it.  Enjoy!

 

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Add that ^^^ to the list of things I'd click on but try to experience no more frequently than a colonoscopy (see Outer Circle discussion of Jimmy Buffett).

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I'm not quite sure how to follow the premise of the thread. Doesn't unique = genre of one?

Simply strolling through my own tastes, many of the artists have their own style. 

The Cowboy Junkies have their own thing

Thomas Dolby is unique

There ain't nothing like Queen

Ah... Devo, St. Vincent, Aimee Mann, Janelle Monae, Prince, Rickie Lee Jones, Monk, U2, Robbie Robertson, etc.

There are plenty of bands that can be tossed into genres like Hair Metal (Ratt, Dokken, Motely Crew and all the hangers-on that came in just a minute too late in 87-90)

🤷‍♂️

 

 

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19 hours ago, Steve Haynie said:

Did Metallica create death metal or not? 

No. One of the first American Thrash bands, to be sure. They had an impact on the death metal genre, but we’re not its (K)reators. 

Edited by RobB
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@RobB thank you for correcting me.  I meant thrash, not death metal.  Did Metallica create thrash?  That is the question I meant to ask.  Death metal requires Cookie Monster vocals over Metallica-esque riffs. 

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yeah.... Zappa, no question

I'll add Pink Floyd (though I also considered YES)

first heavy metal I ever heard was 1969. a friend's (short lived) band called Lucifer with Randy Holden on guitar (former Blue Cheer). the song was "Fruit & Icebergs" (also done when he was in Blue Cheer, but the Lucifer version was way heavier)

Edited by beezerboy
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1 hour ago, Steve Haynie said:

Did Metallica create thrash?  That is the question I meant to ask. 

Nah. They popularized it. I could probably name a dozen or so NWOBHM (and European...) bands that seeded that movement for years before Metallica recorded with Johnny Zazula. When I saw Metallica at shows in L.A. in the early '80s, there was a very small Thrash scene; Abbatoir, Agent Steel, Hirax (Slayer was playing Deep Purple and Maiden covers when they heard Metallica). So small that Metallica relocated to the Bay Area to secure Cliff and to be a part of a scene where venues actually booked likeminded metal bands.

Edited by RobB
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6 hours ago, geoff_hartwell said:

Morphine - Low Rock.

Drums, Bari Sax and Two-String bass played with a slide.
Amazing music and lyrics, and NOBODY sounds like them.

Treat Her Right.  Can't tell which is which, and couldn't tell you which came first. Enjoy them both.

Edited by Toadroller
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Deep Purple/Black Sabbath for Heavy Metal.

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The Cramps - Punk leading to "PsychoBilly" - Is it really a "thing," I don't know, I love Jim Heath/the Rev Horton Heat and you don't get there without The Cramps. Another one of those Akron Ohio Bands like  the Black Keys and say:

 

Devo - Not sure if they "invented" the genre but they were the height of that 80's robotic/synth/rock sound, at least to me

 

The Velvet Underground - I would say the were the pro-genitor to Punk rock years before Search and Destroy from Iggy. The ire, the humor, the angst well before it all really hit a decade later (or 5-6 years later as in the case with Iggy who got there quicker than everyone else). There is some amazing stuff buried in their catalog.

Edited by Drew816
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On 1/9/2021 at 8:39 PM, hamerican gigolo said:

Bill Monroe.

Western Swing was around a long time before Asleep At The Wheel...

Bill Monroe was the "father of bluegrass," but Bob Wills (along with his Texas Playboys) put Western swing on the map. Asleep the Wheel is an unabashed tribute to Bob Wills.

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Meshuggah from Sweden created a style that is now known as djent. I wonder if Hamer USA - still existing- would now build guitars with fanned frets, 7,8,9 strings, Hipshot bridges, bareknuckle pups and change to fancy woods and colors this style of music/ playing is associated with.

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