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zorrow

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zorrow last won the day on April 23

zorrow had the most liked content!

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About zorrow

  • Rank
    Veteran HFCer
  • Birthday 12/04/1970

Previous Fields

  • guitars
    4-digit Standard from Hell, Vector '81 Camo, Vector Schenker custom, Hoyer 5069, Scheithauer Mayday-V, Gibson Primavera V, Gibson Voodoo V...
  • amps
    Tech 21 Power Engine 60
  • fx
    Catalinbread Galileo, SP Custom Treble Booster, Tech-21 Liverpool, Pignose Piggy-in-a-box, Morley George Lynch wah, Electro-Harmonics Holy Grail reverb

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Montreal
  • Interests
    Family, Software Engineering, Judo, Karate, Music (metal, funk, jazz, pop, latin...) and guitars (Hamer, Hoyer, Dean, Gibson...)

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  1. Lotta flair, Brian May. Sounds quite Quee-nish. Thanks for sharing, @gorch!
  2. By the way, what Michael Schenker wrote about Eddie Van Halen’s passing was quite touching —taken from http://www.michaelschenkerhimself.com/home.php:
  3. Brian May played (or plays?) in an extremely popular band, and we all know his unique tone, his classy touch, his melodic taste and his guitar orchestrations are his signature. He contributed to the development of the vocabulary of heavy metal and even was doing tapping way before than EVH. He has been influential for sure. However, he never produced millions of imitators worldwide, all stunned by his stage antics, his sound and his technical prowess. In contrast, EVH and Malmsteen did.
  4. Well, Malmsteen was the very cause of the second wave of shredders in the eighties. All the Shrapnel prodigies, including Jason Becker, Marty Friedman, Tony McAlpine, Paul Gilbert, Vinnie Moore and the likes, were a byproduct of Malmsteen’s influence to some extent. Also, in the power metal, in the death metal and in the prog metal genres, shredders heavily stole from Malmsteen and still do to this day —John Petrucci, Jeff Loomis, Steve Smyth, Henjo Richter, Andy Larocque... So, he might be a narcissistic jerk, but his neoclassical influences went everywhere and impacted the rock guitar world
  5. My side, I had started to fantasize about a new collaboration EVH/Brian May, given Brian had mentioned Van Halen when he received the award from Total Guitar. Now it won’t happen. 😞 And yes, Eddie was an innovator and a fabulous musician, plus one of the three most influential rock guitarists of all times —the other two are Hendrix and Malmsteen. A great one is gone and it’s certainly sad news. 😞
  6. Yesterday I paid homage to him by listening to the “Afterlife” album from the band Blackthorne, where he played. Blackthorne was fronted by Graham Bonnet and had the late Bob Kulick on guitars. This is it —hope you guys will like it: On YouTube: On Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/album/5Ejlm7MIxDggDxUBbnhg4Q?si=nwJZfBwtRJ6MhqcVrI3Yqg
  7. This is sad in many ways. The best times are gone!
  8. Yeah, those pups do look a bit odd on that guitar. The rings hide too much of that beautiful wood. BTW, is the hardware gold?
  9. I love this kind of stuff. Both guitars sound great to me. The Gibby has this heavy/explosive quality in its tone which I simply love. The Hamer sounds more focused and articulate, which is great too. But construction-wise, the Hamer of course will smoke any other guitar out there —not that that Explorer looks bad or anything, but you know what I mean.
  10. And Brian May visibly “knows his stuff” too. Would it be soooo great if Eddie and Brian did something together again!
  11. Curiously, it’s “London 1666” the one I like the less from the bunch. The vocal lines are almost the same during the verses, which repeat four times. I find myself singing a second voice on verses three and four, as that would have added more color to the song. The way it is, well... it’s just too raw, too naked. It actually sounds to me like the poor man’s Judas Priest. Nonetheless, it has grown on me —at least that. 🤷🏻‍♂️
  12. Alcatrazz is about to release a new album with Joe Stump on guitars and three singles are already out. One of them is a song Steve Vai wrote for them —this one: One can still notice Steve Vai’s signature on it, but given it’s Joe Stump who plays, it doesn’t sound like Steve Vai. The tone and the articulation aren’t the same, of course, but above all, it’s Vai’s playing fire which isn’t there. I get a weird feeling while listening to it. It sounds to me like a foreign speaker who is very fluent in your native language, but whose accent is still noticeable. Yet, I find it interest
  13. Still less weird than asking for her old pictures to that magazine, I guess? 🤪🤣🤣🤣🤣
  14. If we had a picture of the other guitar, we would have the definitive answer. Is anyone around the owner of 1 3415 ? Does anyone here know Dianne Palosz, who is the lady in the picture?
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