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New Maple Neck Woes


tweed
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Finally got my Warmoth Boatneck I ordered over a month ago, put on the tuners, strung it up and began to fiddle around with the new partscaster I've been working on. But, I found a couple spots on it where it's pingy on the 8th and 15th fret. I put a small straight edge on it and found a small wobble in that area, but only for a few strings. Can I use sandpaper on it to level it off or do I have to go the Fretting Tool route to fix it ? 

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If you want it done right bring it to someone that is skilled. Ask if you can watch when they fix it. Then nothings screwed up and you'll know the next time. The proper tools probly cost more than the job does.

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Not to sound like a smart ass but Google is your friend... there are plenty of videos to check out... relax, and watch 1/2 dozen videos before attempting... I made a sanding beam with a piece of straight box aluminum but bought a "FretGuru" Crowning File @ Amazon for $40 "indispensable"... good luck and take your time... might also be a good time to pick up some 600-2000 grit sandpaper or 0000 steel wool 

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You need to plan on LCP'ing the entire fingerboard for best results. Warmoth doesn't offer fret leveling so their necks don't leave leveled, they say so on their website. Approximately half the Warmoth necks that cross my bench need full bed leveling to set up desirably. If you spot level a fret or a few of them without proper tooling and/or experience/repetitions, you will very, very, very likely just create a new fret issue adjacent to what you just "fixed." Again, you need to plan on leveling the entire bed in one process for the best results.

I recommend you watch EVERY video you can find on the subject and look for and write down common denominators in every facet of the task, from tooling used to abrasives techniques to even the work surface and room lighting. Use the common denominators particularly when selecting and sourcing tools. Improvising on tools is a recipe for potentially doing doing more harm than good.

Finally, hit your pawn shops and CL and pick up a few cheap guitars to get in practice reps before you attempt to level your "good" stuff. Keep in mind, if you get good LCP results getting your reps, you can sell those improved junkers for more that it cost to acquire them :)

 

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