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Trussrod


ArnieZ
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It shouldn't be a fight - if you really have to crank on it, see a pro. Otherwise, do it in small increments and let it rest/relax/reshape before continuing. It's not hard to snap the thing off.

If I have to go more than a 1/2-turn I'll leave it sit overnight and see what it looks like the next day. That might be overly cautious, but I only needed to break one to figure out what works (for me :lol:).

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When tightening, I’ll loosen a 1/4 turn first to release stored-up tension. Depending on the neck (usually bolt-ons), I sometimes grab the headstock and gently move it back/forth a time or two during adjustment. I tend to set my necks with just a *hair* of relief. 

Edited by RobB
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Oh, you'll feel when it is too much! If it gets to needing you to grab the headstock to tighten more: you're nearly there!

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You can 'pre-bend' the neck in the desired direction so that the truss rod nut isn't doing all the work to bend the neck, and then you're using the nut to maintain the tension rather than to create the tension.  I've awkwardly used a knee and a hand.

It's fair to wonder about the condition of the truss nut threads, and then take the nut out and put a little lube, or anti-sieze, on it. 

Is it possible with some designs that the nut could be 'bottoming out', and need a small washer to get more threads involved?

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Adding a small washer over the end of the rod is always my preferred method on a 1-way rod. If it's a dual/2-way affair then straightening the neck with heat/clamps is the way. Else, steam the board off and replacing the rod is the drastic step...

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On 5/1/2022 at 11:09 AM, hamerhead said:

It shouldn't be a fight - if you really have to crank on it, see a pro. Otherwise, do it in small increments and let it rest/relax/reshape before continuing. It's not hard to snap the thing off.

This is good advice for anyone not experienced with making truss rod adjustments.

 

Having said that, Hamerhead's quote sounds like something Beavis and Butthead would have had a field day with...

 

 

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Edited by Biz Prof
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Don't force a truss rod, take it to someone who's experienced with that and let them push the envelope.

The pre-bending-the-neck suggestion is helpful, particularly on old Jazz Bass necks that have gone to the banana over time.

Sometimes the stick in the case of a single-action rod is friction between the removable nut and the rod. In that case I take the nut off (lefty loosy), put some Chap Stick in the threads, reinstall (righty tighty) and I very often get a touch more movement/range in the process. Not the case with dual-action rods, you will destroy the assembly if you remove that design's adjustment nut.

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So weird, in all the years I've been making noise & all the guitars that I've owned/played, I have never encountered a truss rod that wouldn't give me a back bow "straight neck"... I've had them stuck straight, to be able to remove the nut not allowing enough relief but never the other way

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Said guitar is a Hamer, was pretty dry when I got it, based  on the fretboard. I’m giving it some time. Not remotely interested in popping the fingerboard off. This is the most I have ever had to adjust on a Hamer

Thanks again for the help!

Arnie

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Be thankful that you don't have a pre-1984 Rickenbacker:

https://www.rickresource.com/rrp/basstrussrods.html

Quote:  It is important to note that for models made before 1984 that the truss rods were not designed to move the neck by tightening alone. For pre 1984 instruments, the neck should be moved into place manually and then the rods tightened to hold the neck in position. Failing to follow this procedure may pop the fretboard from the neck of your Rickenbacker.

 

 

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