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long cable run signal loss


Mindseyes

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If you -really- cared about your music, you'd get the latest from Mogami.

Superconducting cable modules. Helium coolant not included.

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In technical terms, it's referred to as buffering. It's how our telephone lines retain capacitance over miles and miles of cable. Each telephone pole has a small amplifier that boosts the signal level back up to it's original level back from it's reduced capacitance from the long cable run. ISP decimators have "line buffers" worked into their circuits... a small boost at the end of the chain is all you need.

Check out the Pedals/FX that you currently own, many of them have buffers worked into their circuitry, you might be surprised to know that your rig is already buffered.

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I remember PRS saying that was the purpose of the sweet switch on the early PRS guitars to help combat signal loss over long cable runs.

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I remember PRS saying that was the purpose of the sweet switch on the early PRS guitars to help combat signal loss over long cable runs.

For realz? I thought it was to make your guitar sound like it has inhaled helium...

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I remember PRS saying that was the purpose of the sweet switch on the early PRS guitars to help combat signal loss over long cable runs.

I had read that it was to simulate the treble roll off that occurs with long cable runs... IIRC, Carlos wanted it when he switched from long cables to wireless. I read this on the inter-web some time ago so who knows what is correct.

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Thanks for the input guys!

This was actually for my other guitar player, we messed around with his board today and got it sounding pretty good with the boost knob on his Maxon compressor, he's running a 30' to his board from a racked wireless and then another 30' back to the amp and was missing some gain on his drive tones, juicing it with the comp. has seemed to make him happy once again.

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Zvex SHO (Super Hard on) as the first first pedal on your pedal board.

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I run a 20' guitar cable into a Fryette (not VHT) Valvulator I tube buffer/power supply into my pedalboard. It's a big improvement in sound with my guitars that have passive pickups.

Guitar George

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VOX made something like this 20 years ago, I used it in my effects loop when I had my marshall and it was like an exciter that added extra even order harmonics, I loved it. I Let a friend borrow it and never got it back.

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I remember PRS saying that was the purpose of the sweet switch on the early PRS guitars to help combat signal loss over long cable runs.

I had read that it was to simulate the treble roll off that occurs with long cable runs... IIRC, Carlos wanted it when he switched from long cables to wireless. I read this on the inter-web some time ago so who knows what is correct.

Ahhh, that's it! I had it backwards. Thanks for clarifying that.

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In technical terms, it's referred to as buffering. It's how our telephone lines retain capacitance over miles and miles of cable. Each telephone pole has a small amplifier that boosts the signal level back up to it's original level back from it's reduced capacitance from the long cable run.

You are referring to what is known as a load coil. It is basically an inductor, not an amplifier. The most common type is the H88, meaning it has 88 mH of inductance. The first one is placed 3000 ft from the telephone office and then they are placed every 6000 ft after that. Their purpose is to combat the loss of high frequencies in the voice band by adding inductance to cancel the capacitive effects of long cable runs. A phone line will work just fine without load coils up to around 18,000 ft out though. If you have DSL then the load coils have been removed from your line. We do use a product known as "smart coils" if you have DSL and are more than 18,000 ft from the DSLAM.

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