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Yesterday on Facebook somebody posted a link to a video about drummer Steve Gadd and how his chops and creativity influenced certain aspects of pop music. I started thinking about some jazz albums I had that included Steve Gadd before Steeley Dan pressed him into service for '"Aja." There he was on the mid-'70s George Benson CTI album, "Bad Benson" The opening cut of Paul Desmond's "Take Five" was a good showcase for both Benson and Gadd, so here it is:

Benson was playing a Guild Starfire semihollow thinline for this. It was before his Ibanez days.

After that I got a hankerin' for Mark Knopfler, so here's the cut that turned my head and grabbed my attention in 1978, "Sultans of Swing,"

...followed by "Money for Nothing" from their eponymous album, "Brothers in Arms," which I listened to the whole way through.

 

Edited by JohnnyB
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Definitely NOT my mainstream listen, but this is what made me accept gravel as a legitimate style.

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Because of the other thread—-Big Star #1 Record has been spinning non-stop this week.

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42 minutes ago, Jakeboy said:

Because of the other thread—-Big Star #1 Record has been spinning non-stop this week.

I love the way the acoustics are recorded on the Big Star records. It's not a very organic sound, but the heavy compression/EQ gives those tracks, "sparkle", for lack of a better term.

I've been searching the web for Jim Dickinson/John Fry articles on this subject to no avail, mostly. There was some talk about how the new (then...) Dolby process was a key to getting the guitars to step up a bit.

 

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1 hour ago, RobB said:

I love the way the acoustics are recorded on the Big Star records. It's not a very organic sound, but the heavy compression/EQ gives those tracks, "sparkle", for lack of a better term.

I've been searching the web for Jim Dickinson/John Fry articles on this subject to no avail, mostly. There was some talk about how the new (then...) Dolby process was a key to getting the guitars to step up a bit.

 

Yes, the acoustics sometimes sound almost electric, but not like Keith Richards 60s acoustics. You are correct.. the compressionand eq remind me of some of Jeff Lynne’s  power pop acoustic productions...such as some of the guitars on TP’s Full Moon Fever.

I am mesmerized by the electrics though. Jangly, crunchy and articulate at the same time. Good production on those guitars. 

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Great fun when doing serious hi fi rig listening  

 

 

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On 8/21/2019 at 6:17 PM, JohnnyB said:

Yesterday on Facebook somebody posted a link to a video about drummer Steve Gadd and how his chops and creativity influenced certain aspects of pop music. I started thinking about some jazz albums I had that included Steve Gadd before Steeley Dan pressed him into service for '"Aja." There he was on the mid-'70s George Benson CTI album, "Bad Benson" The opening cut of Paul Desmond's "Take Five" was a good showcase for both Benson and Gadd, so here it is:

Benson was playing a Guild Starfire semihollow thinline for this. It was before his Ibanez days.

After that I got a hankerin' for Mark Knopfler, so here's the cut that turned my head and grabbed my attention in 1978, "Sultans of Swing,"

...followed by "Money for Nothing" from their eponymous album, "Brothers in Arms," which I listened to the whole way through.

 

Johnny, Love Love Love Dire Straits! Communiqué is one of my all-time favorite albums! Great stuff!

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Edited by Dave Scepter
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I have a clutch of 33-1/3 RPM LPs that are in mono, including the 2014 EMI/Parlophone reissue/remaster of the real Beatles LPs in mono, plus a nice smattering of 1950s-'60s vintage LPs rescued from thrift shops. I also have a pretty nice monophonic phono cartridge, which really focuses the essence of the music and drops the noise floor to near zero. Last night I swapped out my stereo cartridge for the mono one and dialed in the proper tracking force, rake angle, and anti-skate settings to bring out the best in it. Then I started spinning some of those luscious-sounding mono LPs, starting with an awesome 3-LP reissue of "After Midnight" by Nat King Cole plus a backing trio. It's a 3-LP set mastered at 45 4pm, which is sort of equivlalent to 30 ips tape. Here are a couple of King Cole classics I treated myself to last night. Nat makes it look and sound so easy. Nat sold so many hit records in his heyday that the Capitol Records tower in Hollywood was dubbed as "The house that Nat built." 

It's Only a Paper Moon:

 

and Route 66. Look at how he makes it look (and sound) so easy:

And then I spun the Parlophone/EMI mix and master of "A Hard Day's Night," not the abomination put out by Universal in the USA in 1964:

 

Aah... I feel better now. I'll be spinning some more today.

Edited by JohnnyB
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When I first got back into vinyl in 2007, a co-worker of my wife gave me a storage box full of LPs that had been sitting and (apparently) catching dusk. There were a lot of albums I was aware of, and apparently we had some similar tastes because he had some obscure jazz albums that I had. One that piqued my interest was 1964's "Jazz Impressions of A Boy Named Charlie Brown." by the Vince Guaraldi Trio. I always liked Guaraldi, even before he did the soundtracks for the Peanuts primetime specials, such as the Top 40 hit, "Cast Your Fate to the Wind." That may have been my introduction to jazz and the personal discovery that I liked jazz a lot.

So when I got home I excitedly put the Guaraldi album on and to my dismay, it was too noisy to listen to. So I shelved it. A couple years later I bought a mono cartridge to play the 2014 EMI/Parlophone release of The Beatles albums in mono. Then to play a hunch while I had the mono cartridge on the tonearm, I played this Guaraldi album, and to my surprise and delight, the mono cartridge played it entirely noise-free. I'm listening to it now and enjoying the hell out of it. Guaraldi had a creative, bouncy, endearing form of improvisation. He died way too young (1976, age 47).

 

Edited by JohnnyB
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Pat Travers:  Swing!: New album of Big Band music from a blues/rock guitarist (!) Prepping for an interview with Travers

King Crimson: Meltdown--Live in Mexico: Three CDs (over 3 1/2 hrs. of music) + a Blu-Ray by the latest incarnation of the band, which features three drummers (! again). Prepping for an interview with guitarist Jakko Jaksyzk, who recently garnered a PRS SE signature model with the "Schzoid Man" face on the body.

Travers + King Crimson.jpg

Jakszyk-SE Schizoid-LO.jpg

Edited by Willie G. Moseley
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