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Hamer guitars for heavy metal!


Do we want Hamer shred machines back?  

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The current Hamer Co. is happy to have become a boutique outfit and that's Jol and Co's perogative..I don't think you'll really ever see the return of any of the shredders from them..its mostly the yippies and yuppies that are all in search of tones from the graves of SRV and assorted acts of the Fillmore..the same guys that want to debate bumblebee caps and vintage blah blah and bling bling as opposed to spending time slumped over one guitar practicing. Its smart marketing to pedal to a crowd that is for the most part able to part with some disposable income for the bragging rights to owning some top shelf wood. There's no wrong or right..its just not where they want to be or what they want to be building..there's more "respect" and legitimacy in building jazz boxes.

That's dead on!!!!

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There's a rebirth of shred? Where?

European countries. Im in contact with a number of friends all over the world. Only in the US is shed type HM not as popular and there are signs of its return. Its a pendulum.

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It is also still a big deal in Japan.

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I would love to have a NEW, set neck cali. I would sell my sl1 jackson to get it. Since hamer don't do that anymore I have to run with jackson.

Hell, I'd love to have an OLD set neck Cali! They must be nice because the chosen few that have them seem to be holding onto them :).

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I had a set neck Cali a few years back. Loved it, but it's long gone-fortunately being loved by another HFCer last I heard.

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Metal is not in the guitar; it's in the hands.

Specifically, it's in the tips of the index and pinky fingers.

:)

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LOL she's halfway there.

Anybody got a JPEG of Ronny James Dio with his index finger up one nostril and his pinky up the other? Photoshoppers, start your engines!

(Note: I said nostrils. Please keep subsequent posts safe for work. :) )

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I have it on good authority that Jol will be making new Hamer USA shred models.... just as soon as the hair he losts starts growing back.

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I have it on good authority that Jol will be making new Hamer USA shred models.... just as soon as the hair he losts starts growing back.

:P:):P:):P

Sounds like if Hamer did consider bringing back shredders, they'd have a hard time pleasing everyone. Should they have thick necks, or thin like back in the 80's? Bolt neck or set neck? Graphics and sparkle finishes like in the 80's or a more classic look with flame maple and binding? Floyds or fixed bridges?

Unless they bring back the policy of "we'll build anything you're willing to pay for", sounds like a lot of guys looking for the return of Hamer shredders would still be unhappy.

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Should they have thick necks, or thin like back in the 80's? Bolt neck or set neck? Graphics and sparkle finishes like in the 80's or a more classic look with flame maple and binding? Floyds or fixed bridges?

Yes.

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I'd love to see a Virt drop 6 with the 26 1/2" scale, scalloping on fretboard optional, with a fixed bridge, either a Sustain Block or one of those Tune O Matics with the string ferrules for going though the body.

For a pickup, instead of the Hot Rails, I wouldn't mind seeing a Dimarzio Super Distortion S or Tone Zone S. Or they could put a full size humbucker there and use a Dimarzio D Sonic.

Medium neck.

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I question how big of a trend it is. I say it's fringe appeal at best. Metal music isn't all over the airwaves, neither television nor radio, like it was back in the '80s. Not by a longshot.

There's a big difference between what was metal then and what is reckoned metal today. Did they play Venom, Bathory or Ministry on mtv in the 80s? On ordinary music video shows (not the metalshows) in NOrway the play Satyricon and Stonegard in addition to all the britney and christina crap. Dimmu Borgir has sold over a million records, and black metal was a very small underground scene only 10 years ago. From what I understand the metalcore thing is VERY big in america these days, so calling it a fringe appeal is from my point of view an understatement

I play heavy metal on my standard and agree with the person who said that metal is in your fingers, not in your axe. I saw a concertclip with Dark Tranquillity, I belive it was "punish my heaven" (great song by the way), where Niklas Sundin played a strat with single coils, so you don't have to have a BC Rich with EMGs to play metal.

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The best heavy metal was made before shredder guitars existed. Les Pauls, SGs, V's, Explorers, Strats with bridge humbuckers... That's what made the best, and real, metal. Fu*k the hair band pop crap.

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Its already been said, but metal is all in your hands and what/how you play. I play metal and or variations of it more than any other style, and I only have 1 legitimate "shred/metal" guitar in my Ibanez Sabre. Everything else I own is pretty much the woods, scale length, and construction of a Les Paul type guitar, just change the shape around to a Dean ML, Monaco, Explorer, etc.

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Well, my impression is that they don't dare to penetrate into a market in which they could actually make some bucks just by making slight modifications to some of their models.

I own an old Californian '91 and a new Vector XT. Both are great guitars, and currently I even prefer the Vector to play anything I have to play. Many people I know get impressed when they see these guitars, and at the same time recognise good quality there. But nobody seems to notice that a Vector or a Californian are good choices faced to ESP/LTD, Jackson or Ibanez imports.

In my opinion there's poor marketing there. For example, I believe a black or red Vector with boomers and Duncan-Designed open coils could easily enter in the current game. One little of visibility and people will embark for sure. If in addition you add both Tune-o-matic bridges and floating tremolos as options, as well as jumbo frets like Jackson's, they would be in!

Also, take for example the current import Californian XT. That's a good example of unappealing design. It is a guitar with a lot of binding and everything, but it lacks of fret inlays. Hey! Dots or boomers, but please place some inlays on its fretboard, for the Goddess' sake! And also spare all that super-binding! Metal guitarists won't buy a guitar that looks too vintage, while other guitarists won't buy a guitar that looks too metal. I wonder how many of those sell today!

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I think that it would be great to see a USA Californian line. Why does that guitar have to be considered a shred guitar. There are plenty of company's making high end model guitars with floyd's(Suhr/Tom Anderson). Make them with maple tops, sunburst, neck thru, just make them. I use my Californian for every band I work with, lessons, and studio stuff. It's a great guitar period. You don't want to make them in hot pink don't! I would like some options instead of having to buy second hand all the time. I talked to Hamer once about getting a Californian made in 2004 and they acted like it would be to much money to make one. Like I can't afford it or it wouldn't be worth their time. I don't "shred" on my Californian that's what my Jackson is for.

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Me too.

Got 2 Chaps but will be looking to get another guitar (Probably with 7 strings) next year. Got the money and would love to consider Hamer but thats not an option.

The current range of Hamer guitars are beautiful instruments but they're not for me. I'm not into the retro style.

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I'm all for metal-styled axes. Hamer was number one in the day.

I'm not sure if it was marketing, the introduction of the slammer series, or something else, which led to their exit from this market, but it was their presence in this segment which prompted me to purchase their products and develop as a guitarist. A number of premier rock and metal acts used their products exclusively, over other brands such as ESP, Jackson/Charvel and BC Rich.

Craftsmanship aside, I'm still perplexed as to the appeal of their current USA catalog.

If I want a Les Paul, then I'll buy a Les Paul:

DSC01407.jpg

If I want a metal axe, I cannot buy Hamer - because they refuse to build them anymore. Even though I am a long-time loyal customer, they have chosen not to serve my needs, which is unfortunate as I would love to continue supporting them. I'm lucky to have snapped up a dozen choice axes of theirs over the years. But now, they have chosen to exclusively build models which suit old men with fat wallets, as opposed to young up & coming rock/metal players. I apologize for any offense taken in this observation, but that is my view from the side that is losing out in Hamer's decision to shun metal players from their ranks.

Luckily, there is still Neal Moser and MCS which is willing to build quality metal axes for players like me. I'm thankful for what Hamer's given, they've moved on and so must we all.

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Probably going to make some folks grumpy with this, but, as much as I would love to see new versions of the "classic" shredders re-appear, I'm afraid it's just not gonna happen in the USA line.

While I agree with most of the opinions already stated as to why, let's not forget a couple of the other reasons. Even though the vast majority of us here are just a bit nutty about Hamers (with many of us owning more than one), I think we really are a minority in the overall scheme of things. Would you be willing to gamble with the bottom line of your company for a relatively small group of people?

Couple that with the fact that when Hamer has shown willingness to do something outside of their current "standard" line (such as a limited run of custom orders), just about everyone who has said "I'd buy that if it was available" suddenly disappears when it's time to pony up a deposit.

So, what choices are there? Well, to state the obvious:

- Buy an import. Several of the classic shredders have been reintroduced as imports. It's a good way for Hamer to stick their toe in the pool regarding shredders without impacting the USA line. Is it as good as a USA model? Subjectively, probably not, but if you get one, are you going to feel as bad about dinging it up as you would with a 20 year old "rare" USA model?

- Find a used USA version. Easier said than done and getting harder to do these days. I think we've all had sellers remorse about regarding that Vector, Chaparral, Diablo or Californian (or Miller graphic) we used to own. So when one turns up for sale they tend to get grabbed and not go up for sale again. But are you going to gig with an older USA given the relative rarity of the model?

I still think the build quality of Hamer guitars is, on average, better than other manufacturers. In fact, barring any clearly stated problems, Hamers are the only guitars I will buy sight unseen. But, I think the days of USA shredder models are sadly gone.

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I think that some of the guitars Hamer makes now are fine for metal, but maybe they just dont push it that way. I remember 3 or 4 years ago or so when Ryan Primack from Poison the Well (one of my favorite and I think one of the most unique sounding heavy bands out there today) was using just the import Hamer Studios and they sounded great for what he was doing with them. I dont think that the state of music is such that you need 24 frets, superhot pickups and a Floyd Rose to play metal guitar so much anymore.

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I think that some of the guitars Hamer makes now are fine for metal, but maybe they just dont push it that way. (...) I dont think that the state of music is such that you need 24 frets, superhot pickups and a Floyd Rose to play metal guitar so much anymore.

Of course they are fine for metal! My Vector import simply rocks. But they don't push it that way at all. And even if you don't need a Floyd Rose to play metal (nowadays I personally dislike floating bridges) that still is a must-have gadget for many players. I mean, I know the player and the music is what matters the most, but Hamer could actually push it that way and I don't even think it would be such a big effort or investment.

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