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So .. how do the large soup makers (Campbell's, etc.) make all that chicken stock?


JGale
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Probably a lot of chicken necks, backs and feet. Seems like most of the population believes that boneless, skinless chicken breast is superior so there's a lot of leftovers for making stock. They might utilize egg hens that no longer lay eggs, they ain't good for much beyond stock.

 

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Not completely related, but I was living in Gainesville Florida in 1984 at the beginning of the buffalo wing craze and some good friends own a dive bar that started making buffalo wings.  We would often go late to party and they would run out of wings.  We could make wing runs to to local grocer and get multi pound packs at 25 cents a pound. Sometimes even better at 11:00 PM at night.   Nobody wanted chicken wings then.  It was a throw away part of the chicken.  Now...

 

P.S.  I still love that wing recipe most of all.

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A friend worked for a company that makes plastic for food packaging.  Some employees were invited to chicken processing plant where they saw chickens go through what could be called a disassembly line.  At the each step the visitors were shown what was left and then got explanations of where the remaining parts went.  At the very end there was something like a breast bone left, something thought to be throwaway, but even that had a use.  The meat makes money.  The rest makes money. 

Those leftover parts are likely making chicken stock or fertilizer. 

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12 hours ago, DaveH said:

Care to share?

it is surprisingly simple.  

Fry the wing pieces till quite hard but not too brown.   We would pull one out of oil and thump it with our finger to check.

the sauce:  Originally it was stick Parkey Margarine,  Crystal River Hot Sauce and that is all.  

Change ratio to change heat.  Optional,  add diced fresh jalapeños or prepared horseradish or both.

I use real butter now but only Crystal River Hot sauce.

I am sure part of the appeal is the nostalgia. 

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On 2/16/2022 at 11:04 PM, Stike said:

Probably a lot of chicken necks, backs and feet. Seems like most of the population believes that boneless, skinless chicken breast is superior so there's a lot of leftovers for making stock. They might utilize egg hens that no longer lay eggs, they ain't good for much beyond stock.

 

I‘d see that those egg hens would make a reasonable soup. Egg hens don‘t need breast and wings. Their food directly convert to egg. When they stop making eggs, they‘re almost squeezed out.

For meat production there are different sorts of hens. Men are actually useless and be immediately shred after birth. They stopped shredding by law in Germany. They are now trying to create a market for the cocks.

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On 2/16/2022 at 9:46 PM, DaveH said:

Care to share?

 

On 2/17/2022 at 10:38 AM, mathman said:

it is surprisingly simple.  

Fry the wing pieces till quite hard but not too brown.   We would pull one out of oil and thump it with our finger to check.

the sauce:  Originally it was stick Parkey Margarine,  Crystal River Hot Sauce and that is all.  

Change ratio to change heat.  Optional,  add diced fresh jalapeños or prepared horseradish or both.

I use real butter now but only Crystal River Hot sauce.

I am sure part of the appeal is the nostalgia. 

Try this for a much more crispy wing.

Make a 1:1 mixture of salt and baking powder and toss with wings 1 1/2 teaspoons per pound. Place wings on a rimmed baking sheet and refrigerate uncovered overnight. The salt will season the meat all the way through and break down some proteins so the meat retains more moisture as they cook, more succulent. The baking powder and overnight rest dehydrates the skin and changes the pH some so when it cooks it gets super crispy with lots of little air bubbles, more surface area for sauce.

I find that the drumettes, especially the really large ones can be kind of tough and wings in general have a fair amount of connective tissue/collagen so they benefit from some slow cooking to break that down. Fry them once at about 225F for about 20 minutes, let them cool and fry again at 375-400 for about 10 minutes. Add sauce and grub.

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We always would bread them and refrigerate before frying.  Forgot to add that part.  Bowl of whole milk and bowl of the flour salt mixture.

dunk in milk then in flour.

 

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1 hour ago, Stike said:

I find that the drumettes, especially the really large ones can be kind of tough and wings in general have a fair amount of connective tissue/collagen so they benefit from some slow cooking to break that down. Fry them once at about 225F for about 20 minutes, let them cool and fry again at 375-400 for about 10 minutes. Add sauce and grub.

What would that be in an Air Fryer?  

 

;)  :D :P 

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Chicken wings?.. I've tried all the different recipes... the real simple way I make them now is to wash, then thoroughly pat dry, season, cook in a pizza oven on a pre-heated cast iron pan, toss in a sauce consisting Frank's Hot sauce, butter,  Worcestershire sauce, pepper

Edited by Dave Scepter
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I’ll put my air fryer wings against most any other wings I’ve had in restaurants known for their wings. 
 

I do a dry rub (secret recipe… 🤫)

shake over unbreaded wings to coat. Air fry at 380, shake and reseason every 7-8 minutes until 100% coated and cooked to your liking…

54D847C3-6D0A-4531-B146-B691D6FA7917.jpeg

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Yea, some of you guys are talking about chicken wings.  They look fine. Probably taste great.  I am talking about Buffalo Wings as they were first christened.  The guys that opened the place in Gainesville came from buffalo and learned there.  Wings had been in buffalo for some time but this was the first place in Gainesville to make them. Later of course they were every where.  My aged brain may be mixing up the dates.  I was there in 1982 for a short time and then lived there in 84.  I really think this was was of my party visits.   Yes, they modified the recipe, but buffalo wings are FRIED as in f#$#ing grease in a deep fry pot.  Batter was added and I don't complain.

For a southern boy used to fried chicken these were a revelation!

 Every thing since then is variation and modification.  Not bad, mind you.  Not what I am talking about.  Carry on...

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BTW, I have a long history with chickens... My family had an egg farm in the Panhandle of Florida.  We sold the old laying hens to companies that would create animal foods from the old chickens.  Sure they used all the parts then also.  This was the 60's- 80's.

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1 hour ago, Dave Scepter said:

Yes we know this... just giving options for the waist & HEART conscious old folk 🤣

👍Which is why I don’t eat them very often anymore.  But if you are going to ride a horse, then ride a stallion.  😀

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The factory that does the Cambells chicken soup stuff is about 60 miles from me, all I know is they employee a lot of people and kill truck loads of chickens raised specifically to die there. You can't bring a chicken there and trade it for soup. It is also very close to a lake, but what isn't in Mn. 

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On 2/26/2022 at 8:08 AM, stobro said:

They simply use industrial grade Super Bass-o-matics.

 

God, those SNL bits in the 70s were the best.  The writers are nowhere near as creative now.  

Edited by scottcald
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4 hours ago, alantig said:

I have the first five seasons on DVD.  As good as they were, there were a ton of duds as well.

Sure, with 90 minutes of live skits you'll have that.  But I feel like they have less over the top funny stuff now and less wacky ideas like the Bassmaster or Teddy Chainsaw.  In general it was just weirder - in a good way. 

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9 hours ago, scottcald said:

Sure, with 90 minutes of live skits you'll have that.  But I feel like they have less over the top funny stuff now and less wacky ideas like the Bassmaster or Teddy Chainsaw.  In general it was just weirder - in a good way. 

I think it's become more about the individual's performance than the characters or the off-kilter idea.  For every Bill Hader, it seems like there are five or six cast members who have one bit and run it into the ground (granted, over different characters).  I still enjoy Weekend Update, but it's very rare that a skit interests me long enough to watch the whole thing.

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3 hours ago, alantig said:

I think it's become more about the individual's performance than the characters or the off-kilter idea.  For every Bill Hader, it seems like there are five or six cast members who have one bit and run it into the ground (granted, over different characters).  I still enjoy Weekend Update, but it's very rare that a skit interests me long enough to watch the whole thing.

I'm blaming Lorne Michaels. 

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