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Albums that as a guitar player you felt obligated to buy and ended up hating


MCChris

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Whatever that EP was with EVH, Brian May, and Phil Chen, IIRC. Mercifully, I've forgotten.

You're talking about the Starfleet project. It also fell short to my expectations when I listened to it for the first time. You know, EVH and BHM together, that had to be sooo great! But no, it wasn't. :(

I recently undusted my own copy and listened to it once again, because Gorch is a big fan of it and we share several tastes. Well, I didn't hate it this time, but I'm still a bit disappointed about it. So, I would not recommend it to casual May or EVH fans -but just to completists.

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I actually enjoyed the Di Meola clip above, no big surprise though since my musical tastes tend to be far from conventional. Oddly enough the only major disappointment I can remember was a Gary Moore disc "Blues for Greeny". Odd because I have quite a few of his disc's and am usually a big fan but I hated that one and ended up giving it away after the first listen.

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" At least I had the good sense to never buy Breakfast in America."

Damn!, Hamerica raises his hand. Really not a guitar album but after buying that album (BiA) I hated myself enough to continuously play "Out of the Blue" by ELO.

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Damn!, Hamerica raises his hand. Really not a guitar album but after buying that album (BiA) I hated myself enough to continuously play "Out of the Blue" by ELO.

As potent an illustration of the depth of the shittiness of BiA as you'll ever read.

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I would have to say that early ufo album, the one with the studio version of doctor doctor

didn't last very lone on my turntable...

but yeah, I second the thought, band, performance, and the songs...

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I actually enjoyed the Di Meola clip above, no big surprise though since my musical tastes tend to be far from conventional. Oddly enough the only major disappointment I can remember was a Gary Moore disc "Blues for Greeny". Odd because I have quite a few of his disc's and am usually a big fan but I hated that one and ended up giving it away after the first listen.

I've never been able to get into Gary. Maybe it's because he stood next to Scott Gorham - one of my all time favorites - and played like he was paid by the note. He came across as a real ball hog in the "One Night in Dublin" DVD, too. That could be forgivable, here and there, but I find his approach more cliched than clever - both his writing AND playing. Everything is this grand gesture...gets way old.

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Pat Metheny's discography numbers around 85, not counting compilations. His "breezy Brazilian" (i.e., easy listening) period spans around 6 of those 85 albums, about 7% of his total recorded output, all with the Pat Metheny Group of the '80s. Try listening to "Bright Size Life" or "Song X" and see if he's still a Kenny G to you.

Do you really think Jaco Pastorius, Gary Burton, Chick Corea, Ornette Coleman, Jack DeJohnette, Steve Swallow, Christian McBride, Jim Hall, Joni Mitchell, Lee Konitz, Josh Redman, Michael Brecker, Charlie Haden, Herbie Hancock, Roy Haynes, Brad Mehldau, David Bowie, John Scofield, and numerous others of that stature would line up to collaborate with him if he's nothing more than the Kenny G of guitar?

You know, of his more "easy listening" albums, I bought Secret Story (1992). I remember being disappointed that there wasn't a lot of actual guitar (lots of guitar synth, but not so much straight guitar). After a few listens, however, I found myself completely fascinated by the accompanying Cambodian choir - there were all these microtonal harmonies that were just fantastic! I still listen to that album, but now for the choral arrangements rather than guitar.

As JohnnyB pointed out, if you've never heard him with straight guitar, he is definitely an incredibly capable guitarist.

http://youtu.be/BWabRD0c_VQ

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Add Pat Metheny to my list; the definitive examples (for me) being OFFRAMP and FIRST CIRCLE from way back when. The first two Pat Metheny Group albums were brilliant--uncluttered, melodic and chock fulla unique guitar and bass tones, and the first one would make desert-island-top-ten list. Their second album, AMERICAN GARAGE, was a close, er, second, and I liked AS FALLS WICHITA, SO FALLS WICHITA FALLS, but once he got to messing too much w/ that blatting guitar synth, I got alienated. "Forward March" on FIRST CIRCLE was reason I stopped buying his music---like listening to fingernails on a blackboard.

Although some interesting songs occasionally harkened back to that original melodic goodness ("Last Train Home" comes to mind), Metheny's was, and perhaps still is, an experimenter. Not that there's anything wrong with that; thank goodness some artists do indeed decline to rest on their laurels, but the flip side is that longtime fans of a particular early facet of the artists' music might not appreciate being sonic guinea pigs.

P.S. "Sonic Guinea Pigs" might make a good name for a band, for that matter...

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I am a huge Jeff Beck fan, until Blow by blow, Wired, There and Back.....I just don't dig fusion, jazz based rock. I love blues based playing, hence I get Hendrix and LOVE the first 2 Jeff Beck Group albums.

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Add Pat Metheny to my list; the definitive examples (for me) being OFFRAMP and FIRST CIRCLE from way back when. The first two Pat Metheny Group albums were brilliant--uncluttered, melodic and chock fulla unique guitar and bass tones, and the first one would make desert-island-top-ten list. Their second album, AMERICAN GARAGE, was a close, er, second, and I liked AS FALLS WICHITA, SO FALLS WICHITA FALLS, but once he got to messing too much w/ that blatting guitar synth, I got alienated. "Forward March" on FIRST CIRCLE was reason I stopped buying his music---like listening to fingernails on a blackboard.

Although some interesting songs occasionally harkened back to that original melodic goodness ("Last Train Home" comes to mind), Metheny's was, and perhaps still is, an experimenter. Not that there's anything wrong with that; thank goodness some artists do indeed decline to rest on their laurels, but the flip side is that longtime fans of a particular early facet of the artists' music might not appreciate being sonic guinea pigs.

P.S. "Sonic Guinea Pigs" might make a good name for a band, for that matter...

You're right on target here!

American Garage was my first Metheny album, one I got when I was looking for more jazz and fusion stuff.

Got it around the same time I got 'Brasilia' by John Klemmer, 'Carmel' by Joe Sample and 'Casino' by Al DiMeola. 'Casino' was the only dog in the bunch.

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Oh forgot one!

Raging Slab- Dynamite Monster Boogie Concert

The guitar rags were praising that one pretty heavily back in the day. Hated it.

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Add Pat Metheny to my list; the definitive examples (for me) being OFFRAMP and FIRST CIRCLE from way back when. The first two Pat Metheny Group albums were brilliant--uncluttered, melodic and chock fulla unique guitar and bass tones, and the first one would make desert-island-top-ten list. Their second album, AMERICAN GARAGE, was a close, er, second, and I liked AS FALLS WICHITA, SO FALLS WICHITA FALLS, but once he got to messing too much w/ that blatting guitar synth, I got alienated. "Forward March" on FIRST CIRCLE was reason I stopped buying his music---like listening to fingernails on a blackboard.

Although some interesting songs occasionally harkened back to that original melodic goodness ("Last Train Home" comes to mind), Metheny's was, and perhaps still is, an experimenter. Not that there's anything wrong with that; thank goodness some artists do indeed decline to rest on their laurels, but the flip side is that longtime fans of a particular early facet of the artists' music might not appreciate being sonic guinea pigs.

P.S. "Sonic Guinea Pigs" might make a good name for a band, for that matter...

I agree and disagree with you on this one, Willie. I agree that the guitar synth really detracts from what could be great music. 'Offramp' needs to be listened to with a remote control. There is some brilliant material (Au Lait, Eighteen, James). Frankly, I love "Are You Going With Me" until the git synth 'climax'. As for 'First Circle', I skip "Forward March" entirely and consider the "Yolanda You Learn" to be the first track on the album. "First Circle" is a brilliant piece of music -- Dynamic, musically interesting, emotional. Much the same as the tribute to Bill Evans, "September Fifteenth" from 'As Falls Wichita...'

There is one song that he recorded that comes to mind where the guitar synth fits into the structure and the power of the piece perfectly. Check out "The Heat of the Day" off the album, 'Imaginary Day'. To be honest, I think 'Imaginary Day' was the last PMG album where every piece was listenable and enjoyable. After that, it was readily apparent that they were just going through the motions. Formulaic, boring music with uninspired solos. Listenable, but boring. I guess he thought so too, as he hasn't done anything with Lyle or the full PMG band since that truly exemplary pile of doggy doo-doo, "The Way Up" in 2005.

He's still making great guitar music, though. Trio projects are all top shelf music, as are the two albums he did with Brad Mehldau. The Unity Band project is outstanding jazz, and the two solo acoustic albums aren't bad either (there are a lot of other solo acoustic players that are much better, though). IMO, the "Orchestrion" project is a little self serving and indulgent for my taste but it would be cool to see performed live.

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He's still making great guitar music, though. Trio projects are all top shelf music, as are the two albums he did with Brad Mehldau. The Unity Band project is outstanding jazz, and the two solo acoustic albums aren't bad either (there are a lot of other solo acoustic players that are much better, though). IMO, the "Orchestrion" project is a little self serving and indulgent for my taste but it would be cool to see performed live.

I liked Pat Metheny's albums through Offramp, but have only occasionally checked in with his recordings since. I like the live album he recorded with Joni Mitchell ("Shadows and Light"). I saw him perform last year, and it was very enjoyable. The Orchestrion is amazing to see live.

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  • 5 weeks later...

My favorite two new "guitar" albums are Pete Thorn's Guitar Nerd, particularly the opening track, "Revenge of the Nerd," which is just flat-out badass, and Joe Gamble's Grosh Tunes, which is a showcase for Grosh Guitars, but every tune is tasty.

Oh yeah, and The Aristocrats eponymous album because Guthrie Govan is a god and the tune "Sweaty Knockers" rocks hard. Like Satch meets Holdsworth.

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Have you checked out "Fatdaddy" from the last album, Up Close? Pretty much my favorite EJ tune ever:

By the way, the EJ Strats are the best I've ever played. I have a Palamino rosewood and a Blonde maple and absolutely love 'em.

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ZZtop. Late 70's. Don't remember the name of the album. Doesn't matter, don't care. What a buildup that record had. Actually, my brother bought the album and saved me the indignity. We listened to the first two songs and then sampled a bit of all the others. We thought "this must be the soundtrack in hell", then lifted the record off the turntable, used it to scoop our puke off the floor (metaphorically speaking) and threw it into the trash. We both despise ZZtop in every way shape or form.

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ZZtop. Late 70's. Don't remember the name of the album. Doesn't matter, don't care. What a buildup that record had. Actually, my brother bought the album and saved me the indignity. We listened to the first two songs and then sampled a bit of all the others. We thought "this must be the soundtrack in hell", then lifted the record off the turntable, used it to scoop our puke off the floor (metaphorically speaking) and threw it into the trash. We both despise ZZtop in every way shape or form.

Yeah... you're right...

There wasn't a single tune on Deguello you could work with...

B)

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  • 2 weeks later...

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